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Given a general tree, I want the distance between two nodes v and w.

Wikipedia states the following:

Computation of lowest common ancestors may be useful, for instance, as part of a procedure for determining the distance between pairs of nodes in a tree: the distance from v to w can be computed as the distance from the root to v, plus the distance from the root to w, minus twice the distance from the root to their lowest common ancestor.

Let's say d(x) denotes the distance of node x from the root which we set to 1. d(x,y) denotes the distance between two vertices x and y. lca(x,y) denotes the lowest common ancestor of vertex pair x and y.

Thus if we have 4 and 8, lca(4,8) = 2 therefore, according to the description above, d(4,8) = d(4) + d(8) - 2 * d(lca(4,8)) = 2 + 3 - 2 * 1 = 3. Great, that worked!

However, the case stated above seems to fail for the vertex pair (8,3) (lca(8,3) = 2) d(8,3) = d(8) + d(3) - 2 * d(2) = 3 + 1 - 2 * 1 = 2. This is incorrect however, the distance d(8,3) = 4 as can be seen on the graph. The algorithm seems to fail for anything that crosses over the defined root.

What am I missing?

enter image description here

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You have two 2's. Is that intentional? –  John Jun 14 '13 at 23:24
    
No it wasn't, I've updated the picture! –  Sirupsen Jun 14 '13 at 23:30
    
lca(8,3)= 1 not 2 ! –  Shashank Jain Jun 15 '13 at 17:46

2 Answers 2

up vote 1 down vote accepted

You missed that the lca(8,3) = 1, and not = 2. Hence the d(1) == 0 which makes it:

d(8,3) = d(8) + d(3) - 2 * d(1) = 3 + 1 - 2 * 0 = 4
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Comment on this minus? –  darijan Jun 17 '13 at 12:59

For the appropriate 2 node, namely the one one the right, d(lca(8,2)) == 0, not 1 as you have it in your derivation. The distance from the root--which is the lca in this case--to itself is zero. So

d(8,2) = d(8) + d(2) - 2 * d(lca(8,2)) = 3 + 1 - 2 * 0 = 4

The fact that you have two nodes labeled 2 is probably confusing things.

Edit: The post has been edited so that a node originally labeled 2 is now labeled 3. In this case, the derivation is now correct but the statement

 the distance d(8,2) = 4 as can be seen on the graph

is incorrect, d(8,2) = 2.

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Ok, I fixed the picture. Thus it's d(8,3) => lca(8,3) = 2, and d(8) + d(3) - 2 * d(2) = 3 + 1 - 2 * 1 = 2, which is incorrect? Why do you would the LCA be the root in this case? It's not really the lowest (=smallest depth) in this case. –  Sirupsen Jun 14 '13 at 23:33
    
@Sirupsen Just saw your comment, please see my edit. –  Matt Phillips Jun 14 '13 at 23:35
    
I'm not sure how you are getting d(8,3) = 2 (assuming you stayed consistent with the old illustration). The path between these nodes is 8 -> 5 -> 2 -> 1 -> 3, thus the distance is 4. –  Sirupsen Jun 14 '13 at 23:36
    
@Sirupsen Now your derivation is incorrect, you mix up d(8,2) and d(8,3). –  Matt Phillips Jun 14 '13 at 23:38
    
Not anymore, please see the latest edit. –  Sirupsen Jun 14 '13 at 23:39

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