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I am trying to learn to use attoparsec. I am trying to parse a text file of the following format:

id int
call_uuid string 30

My code is here:

{-# LANGUAGE OverloadedStrings #-}

import Control.Applicative ((<$>))
import Data.Char (isDigit, isAlpha)
import Data.Attoparsec.Text (Parser, many1, letter, many', char, digit, string, 
                             (.*>), skipSpace, peekChar, decimal, 
                             isHorizontalSpace, skipWhile, parseOnly)
import qualified Data.Text.IO as T

schema :: Parser [(String, String, Maybe Int)]
schema = many1 typelines
  where
    colname = do
      c <- letter
      cs <- takeWhile (\x -> isDigit x || isAlpha x || x == '_')
      return (c:cs)

    int :: (Integral a, Read a) => Parser a
    int = read <$> decimal

    typelines = do
      cname <- colname
      skipWhile isHorizontalSpace
      tname <- takeWhile isAlpha
      skipWhile isHorizontalSpace
      c <- peekChar
      if c == '\n'
        then do { char '\n'; return (cname, tname, Nothing);}
        else do
          num <- int
          char '\n'
          return (cname, tname, num)

readDBTypes :: String -> IO [(String, String, Maybe Int)]
readDBTypes filename = do
  content <- T.readFile filename
  case (parseOnly schema content) of
    Left err -> do 
      print err
      return []
    Right v -> return v

main :: IO ()
main = do
  myLines <- readDBTypes "schema2.out"
  mapM_ print myLines

When I run, I get the following compiler errors (ghc 7.4)

$ runhaskell schema.hs

schema.hs:18:13:
    Couldn't match expected type `attoparsec-0.10.4.0:Data.Attoparsec.Internal.Types.Parser
                                    Data.Text.Internal.Text t0'
                with actual type `[a0] -> [a0]'
    In the return type of a call of `takeWhile'
    Probable cause: `takeWhile' is applied to too few arguments
    In a stmt of a 'do' block:
      cs <- takeWhile (\ x -> isDigit x || isAlpha x || x == '_')
    In the expression:
      do { c <- letter;
           cs <- takeWhile (\ x -> isDigit x || isAlpha x || x == '_');
           return (c : cs) }

schema.hs:22:20:
    Could not deduce (Integral String) arising from a use of `decimal'
    from the context (Integral a, Read a)
      bound by the type signature for
                 int :: (Integral a, Read a) => Parser a
      at schema.hs:22:5-26
    Possible fix:
      add (Integral String) to the context of
        the type signature for int :: (Integral a, Read a) => Parser a
      or add an instance declaration for (Integral String)
    In the second argument of `(<$>)', namely `decimal'
    In the expression: read <$> decimal
    In an equation for `int': int = read <$> decimal

schema.hs:27:16:
    Couldn't match expected type `attoparsec-0.10.4.0:Data.Attoparsec.Internal.Types.Parser
                                    Data.Text.Internal.Text t0'
                with actual type `[a0] -> [a0]'
    In the return type of a call of `takeWhile'
    Probable cause: `takeWhile' is applied to too few arguments
    In a stmt of a 'do' block: tname <- takeWhile isAlpha
    In the expression:
      do { cname <- colname;
           skipWhile isHorizontalSpace;
           tname <- takeWhile isAlpha;
           skipWhile isHorizontalSpace;
           .... }

I am not sure if it is something to do with broken packages in my installation or if I not understanding something about the types. Thanks in advance!

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2 Answers

2 errors here, firstly takeWhile is defined as (a -> Bool) -> [a] -> [a] by the prelude. you probably want takeWhile from Data.Auttoparsec.Text but you'll have to import that first and hide the prelude version.

import Prelude hiding (takeWhile)
import Data.Attoparsec.Text (takeWhile)

But if this code get's any bigger I'd advice

import qualified Data.AttoParsec.Text (takeWhile) as AP

And then just use AP.takeWhile since it's more readable when you don't have to run around looking to see what's hidden from Prelude.

Next decimal will return an Integral a all on it's own so don't fmap read on it. You don't actually need that int function. Haskell's typechecker is smart enough to unify Integral a with Int from your function so just use plain old decimal.

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You need to import takeWhile from Data.Attoparsec.Text, otherwise the compiler will use the one in Prelude.

import Data.Attoparsec.Text (takeWhile)
import Prelude hiding (takeWhile)

decimal already returns an Integral a; no need for read.

int :: Integral a => Parser a
int = decimal
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