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I've implemented a basic search for a research project. I'm trying to make the search more efficient by building a suffix tree. I'm interested in a C# implementation of the Ukkonen algorith. I don't want to waste time rolling my own if such implementation exists.

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Can you elaborate on your question at all? –  Matt Hanson Oct 11 '08 at 0:09
    
I am trying to implement a search within a research project. I've implemented the reverse index and incremental population of the index. Next I was looking to make the search even more efficient but did not want to roll my own ST implementation if one exists. –  Goran Oct 11 '08 at 7:09

2 Answers 2

up vote 10 down vote accepted

Hard question. Here's the closest to match I could find: http://www.codeproject.com/KB/recipes/ahocorasick.aspx, which is an implementation of the Aho-Corasick string matching algorithm. Now, the algorithm uses a suffix-tree-like structure per: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Aho-Corasick_algorithm

Now, if you want a prefix tree, this article claims to have an implementation for you: http://www.codeproject.com/KB/recipes/prefixtree.aspx

<HUMOR> Now that I did your homework, how about you mow my lawn. (Reference: http://flyingmoose.org/tolksarc/homework.htm) </HUMOR>

Edit: I found a C# suffix tree implementation that was a port of a C++ one posted on a blog: http://code.google.com/p/csharsuffixtree/source/browse/#svn/trunk/suffixtree

Edit: There is a new project at Codeplex that is focused on suffix trees: http://suffixtree.codeplex.com/

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I'm looking for the suffix tree. –  Goran Oct 11 '08 at 7:14
1  
Consider your lawn mowed :) –  Goran Sep 6 '09 at 14:31
    
Cool :-) Next Thursday works best :-) –  torial Sep 6 '09 at 16:54

Here is an implementation of a suffix tree that is reasonably efficient. I haven't studied Ukkonen's implementation, but the running time of this algorithm I believe is quite reasonable, approximately O(N Log N). Note the number of internal nodes in the tree created is equal to the number of letters in the parent string.

using System;
using System.Collections.Generic;
using System.Diagnostics;
using System.Linq;
using NUnit.Framework;

namespace FunStuff
{
    public class SuffixTree
    {
        public class Node
        {
            public int Index = -1;
            public Dictionary<char, Node> Children = new Dictionary<char, Node>();
        }

        public Node Root = new Node();
        public String Text;

        public void InsertSuffix(string s, int from)
        {             
            var cur = Root;
            for (int i = from; i < s.Length; ++i)
            {
                var c = s[i];
                if (!cur.Children.ContainsKey(c))
                {
                    var n = new Node() {Index = from};
                    cur.Children.Add(c, n);

                    // Very slow assertion. 
                    Debug.Assert(Find(s.Substring(from)).Any());

                    return;
                }
                cur = cur.Children[c];
            }
            Debug.Assert(false, "It should never be possible to arrive at this case");
            throw new Exception("Suffix tree corruption");
        }

        private static IEnumerable<Node> VisitTree(Node n)
        {
            foreach (var n1 in n.Children.Values)
                foreach (var n2 in VisitTree(n1))
                    yield return n2;
            yield return n;
        }

        public IEnumerable<int> Find(string s)
        {
            var n = FindNode(s);
            if (n == null) yield break;
            foreach (var n2 in VisitTree(n))
                yield return n2.Index;
        }

        private Node FindNode(string s)
        {
            var cur = Root;
            for (int i = 0; i < s.Length; ++i)
            {
                var c = s[i];
                if (!cur.Children.ContainsKey(c))
                {
                    // We are at a leaf-node.
                    // What we do here is check to see if the rest of the string is at this location. 
                    for (var j=i; j < s.Length; ++j)
                        if (Text[cur.Index + j] != s[j])
                            return null;
                    return cur;
                }
                cur = cur.Children[c];
            }
            return cur;
        }

        public SuffixTree(string s)
        {
            Text = s;
            for (var i = s.Length - 1; i >= 0; --i)
                InsertSuffix(s, i);
            Debug.Assert(VisitTree(Root).Count() - 1 == s.Length);
        }
    }

    [TestFixture]
    public class TestSuffixTree
    {
        [Test]
        public void TestBasics()
        {
            var s = "banana";
            var t = new SuffixTree(s);
            var results = t.Find("an").ToArray();
            Assert.AreEqual(2, results.Length);
            Assert.AreEqual(1, results[0]);
            Assert.AreEqual(3, results[1]);
        }
    } 
}
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-@cdiggins, sorry for my ignorance. It is my first time to see a class within another class. In your code,public class Node is within public class SuffixTree, what is the skill herein? –  Love Jul 1 '14 at 15:56

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