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Just like a local .bashrc file, which is sourced every time I entered the directory. How to make this work?

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2 Answers 2

up vote 7 down vote accepted

You can use an alias:

$ echo 'echo "execute something for $PWD"' > tests/.cdrc
$ _cd()
{
    \cd $1
    [ -r .cdrc ] && . .cdrc
}

this function first change to the dir specified as argument, check if the file .cdrc is readable and source it.

$ alias cd=_cd

Then

$ cd tests
execute something for /path/to/tests
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Correct me if I'm wrong, but I guess OP want to monitor a dir IMHO –  sputnick Jun 15 '13 at 2:58
    
I guess OP wants >sourced every time I entered the directory –  dtmilano Jun 15 '13 at 3:04
    
Yes, this is exactly what I am trying to do, what's strange is that it says there is no .cdrc file or directory. Could you explain the second line of _cd function to me, I'm new here. Thank you. –  flyingfoxlee Jun 15 '13 at 3:23
    
@flyingfoxlee If tests to see if the named file exists and is readable and if so attempts to source it as shell commands. –  dmckee Jun 15 '13 at 4:29
1  
There's no need for the alias. Just call the function cd and invoke the builtin with command. –  William Pursell Jun 15 '13 at 6:08

bash and zsh (and probably many other shells) have a feature that allows you to run an arbitrary command before the prompt is displayed. You can use this to source a .dirrc file, and it won't break tab completion.

Here's how to do it in bash:

PROMPT_COMMAND='
if [ "${PREV}" != "$(pwd -P)" ]; then
    if [ -r .dirrc ]; then
        . ./.dirrc
    fi
    PREV=$(pwd -P)
fi
'

From the bash man page:

PROMPT_COMMAND: If set, the value is executed as a command prior to issuing each primary prompt.

This is how to do it in zsh (see the zshmisc man page):

precmd() {
    if [ "${PREV}" != "$(pwd -P)" ]; then
        if [ -r .dirrc ]; then
            . ./.dirrc
        fi
        PREV=$(pwd -P)
    fi
}
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Great solution, What's the PREV variable doing here? –  flyingfoxlee Jun 15 '13 at 6:53
1  
The problem with this approach is that it doesn't satisfy the asker's "every time I enter a directory" requirement. :) (Sorry, couldn't resist.) That is, it won't work as expected in the command sequence: cd foo && make bar, since the enter script will be executed after the make and not before it; it might mean that environment variables were not set as expected. –  rici Jun 15 '13 at 6:55
    
@rici: touché! :) I think it depends on flyingfoxlee's definition of "enter a directory". I had assumed that it meant being at a prompt in that directory, but perhaps I'm wrong. –  Richard Hansen Jun 15 '13 at 18:56
    
@flyingfoxlee: Because the command is run every time the prompt is shown, it'll run over and over even if you stay in the same directory. The PREV command prevents .dirrc from being sourced multiple times while you're still in the same directory (it'll only source .dirrc when you change directories). For a demo of what happens without it, try PROMPT_COMMAND='echo foo' and simply hit enter a few times. –  Richard Hansen Jun 15 '13 at 19:00
    
I see, is precmd() { if [ "${PREV}" != "$(pwd -P)" ]; then if [ -r .dirrc ]; then . ./.dirrc fi PREV=$(pwd -P) fi } ` a better one. This time, the PREV variable is updated every time I switched a directory, not just on those directories that has a .dirrc file in them. –  flyingfoxlee Jun 16 '13 at 2:32

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