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Consider i have an abstract class with a non-abstract method in it.. i tried creating reference type object and access that non-abstract method.. it gives me a compilation error.. The following program demonstrates it-->

abstract class A
{
public void print()
{
System.out.println("this is the print method");
}
}
class test
{
public static void main(String args[])
{
A ob;
ob.print();
}
}

then this is the output i am getting,

 o/p--> error : variable ob might not have been initialized 

If i assume the above as true, then why is it allowing the same in the following program. In the following Applet, i use the paint() method as an entry point. So, here i create a reference type object of predefined class Graphics(an abstract class), and try accessing the drawString() method of it, then no compilation error.. like this-->

import java.applet.*;
import java.awt.*;
public class apptest extends Applet
{
public void paint(Graphics g)// Graphics is an abstract class
{
String s="this is an applet";
g.drawString(s,20,20);
}
}
/*<applet code="apptest" height="500" width="600"></applet>*/

How is this Applet allowing me to do the same ?

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" i tried creating reference type object and access that non-abstract method" i dont see that in your code.You have just created a placeholder for the object. –  BOSS Jun 15 '13 at 4:56
    
@CodeIgnoto ohh.. i think i need to make 'ob' point to some concrete instance type... –  Srinivas Cheruku Jun 15 '13 at 5:01
    
You're confusing 'abstract' with 'uninitialized'. Abstract means you can't make an instantiation of that class, but a parameter or field of an abstract class can still have instantiations of subclasses that are not abstract. –  Patashu Jun 15 '13 at 5:11
    
Maybe because you didn't bother to format the code properly. Maybe because of the irrelevant C# tag. Maybe because of the poor punctuation. Maybe because the two programs are patently NOT the same, and things you are accessing are patently NOT "members" at all. Maybe the conjunction of the above factors was enough to cause someone to think "rubbish question" ... and down-vote it. –  Stephen C Jun 15 '13 at 5:26
    
Or maybe they were just feeling grumpy ... –  Stephen C Jun 15 '13 at 5:27

2 Answers 2

up vote 3 down vote accepted

You have understood it wrong, in the below code Graphics is a parameter to a method, even though its an abstract class

    public void paint(Graphics g)// Graphics is an abstract class
    {
    String s="this is an applet";
    g.drawString(s,20,20);
    }

To invoke this method, the caller should definitely create a concrete instance of type Graphics. Something like below

Graphics g = new TwoDGraphics(); // TwoDGraphics extends Graphics, and a non abstract class
applet.paint(g);

Coming back to your example.. its an error to use an uninitialized variable

A ob; --> its not initialized
ob.print();

a below code should have worked.

A ob = new A() {
  //created an anonymous implementation of abstract A
}
ob.print();
share|improve this answer
    
oh.. fine.. this was the reason.. it means g is being initialized.. –  Srinivas Cheruku Jun 15 '13 at 4:59

Two things:

  1. You cannot instantiate the class
  2. You have only created the reference for your abstaract class and not an object. For caling any instance method you need to have an object not just reference. But in this case you will not be able to create the instance.

So in short you will not be able to achieve what you are trying to do. There two ways to call the non-abstract method of an abstrac class:

  1. Create a child class and using its object you can call the non-abstract method of your abstract class. You may use the reference of either your child class or your parent class, if you have not overridden the method, then call to non-abstract method will always call the parent class method.

  2. Make the method static and call it using the reference of parent clas.

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