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Say I had the following class which contains a list of ElementClass objects and that the ElementClass is mutable:

public class ListContainer {
    private List<ElementClass> elements = new ArrayList<ElementClass>();

    public ListContainer(int n) {
        for (int i = 0; i < n; ++i)
            elements.add(new ElementClass());
    }

    public ElementClass getElement(String index) {
        int i = Integer.parseInt(index);
        if (i < elements.size())
            return elements.get(i);
        return null;
    }
}

How can I make sure that the same reference to an ElementClass object isn't acquired by two different threads and risking unexpected behavior? Can this be done by altering the ListContainer class or do all the thread saftey measures have to be taken in the ElementClass class?

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If you are mutating the object of ElementClass via some method of ElementClass then you should synchronize that mutating method. This would insure that at a time only one thread will be able to mutate that given object by that method. –  Vishal K Jun 15 '13 at 6:49

2 Answers 2

up vote 1 down vote accepted

Firstly, your class (as written) is effectively immutable (from the API perspective) because there is no operation that allows something to modify the list once it has been created.

(You potentially can perform mutating operations on the ElementClass instances in the list. But that is not mutating the list itself.)

If you did add a mutating operation to the ListContainer, you would need to do something to make them thread-safe. But assuming that the inner List object does not "leak", it would be sufficient to make the relevant ListContainer operations synchronized.


Actually, the class as written is not 100% thread-safe. It is possible for one thread to create an instance, pass the reference to another thread, and for the 2nd thread to see a inconsistent version of the instance's list state when it calls the getElement method. This is because there is NOT a happens-before or synchronization order relationship between the constructor completing and subsequent method calls. See JLS 17.4.4 and 17.4.5.

This can be "fixed" in a number of ways. For example:

  • declare getElement as a synchronized method,
  • declare elements as volatile, or
  • declare elements as final.

The last one works because of the special rules for final fields; see JLS 17.5. (If the ListContainer is intended to be immutable, declaring elements as final is the best solution ...)


How can I make sure that the same reference to an ElementClass object isn't acquired by two different threads and risking unexpected behavior?

It would be possible, but it would require an additional data structure ... that tracks which ElementClass instances have been "checked out". And you'd have the problem of clients not "returning" the instances, implementing queues, etcetera.

Can this be done by altering the ListContainer class ...

Only with great difficulty; see above.

... or do all the thread safety measures have to be taken in the ElementClass class?

That is the simplest and the best approach. Either make the relevant (individual) operations synchronized, or devise a "protocol" for locking if you require mutual exclusion for sequences of operations. (The "protocol" is probably just a "rule" for what lock to use ...)

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The safety measures need to be taken in the class ElementClass.

Even if you prevent multiple threads from calling getElement() at the same time, those threads might still retain the reference they receive back and use it at a later time. This would introduce thread safety issues.

In other words, even though they received the reference at different times, it is still the same reference, which can be used simultaneously by multiple threads at a future time.

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