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I have a lot of functions where I take information and populate a class or something. These are willing to accept incomplete information and populate with default values pretty often though.

Here's a crude example.

string name;
string address;
string phonenum;

void SaveClass(string a)
{
    SaveClass(a, "UNSET", "UNSET");
}

void SaveClass(string a, string b)
{
    SaveClass(a, b, "UNSET");
}

void SaveClass(string a, string b, string c)
{
    name = a;
    address = b;
    phonenum = c;
}

It would be really cool though, if I could do something like this.

void SaveClass(string a, optional string b="UNSET", optional string c="UNSET")
{
    name = a;
    address = b;
    phonenum = c;
}

This way I could write out all three overloads in one quick go. Is there anything like this?

Thanks for any help.

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2 Answers 2

up vote 2 down vote accepted

As of C# 4, you can do exactly that with optional parameters:

void SaveClass(string a, string b = "UNSET", string c = "UNSET")

Then when calling the method, you can specify named arguments:

SaveClass("Foo", c: "Some value for C");

Or just use positional arguments which are filled in order:

SaveClass("Foo", "Some value for B");

Named arguments can be used even if you aren't using optional parameters, which can really help if you have many arguments in a method call and it's not clear which is which.

There are restrictions: the default values for optional parameters have to be constants, and the optional parameters have to come at the end of the method signature (aside from params parameters) but the restrictions are all there for good reasons.

One thing to note when looking for more documentation - although the features are properly known as optional parameters and named arguments, many articles (including some in MSDN itself) will talk about "optional arguments" and even "named parameters".

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You can do that. Just remove the optional part from the parameter.

They're called optional parameters. Here, have a MSDN link: Optional Parameters.

You use them like this:

void MyFunc(string x, int y = 0)
{
    //do whatever
}

Small note: it's C# 4 or later, and all optional values must be constant, as what the compiler does is actually burn them into the compiled code. It's just syntax sugar, really.

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