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I have this C code:

EaglePage* EaglePage_RealCopy(EaglePage *page)
{
    if(NULL == page) {
        return NULL;
    }

    switch(page->type) {

        case EagleDataTypeUnknown:
            EagleLogger_Log(EagleLoggerSeverityError, "Cannot page of Unknown type.");
            return NULL;

        case EagleDataTypeInteger:
            return EaglePage_RealCopyInt_(page);

        case EagleDataTypeVarchar:
            return EaglePage_RealCopyVarchar_(page);

        case EagleDataTypeFloat:
            return EaglePage_RealCopyFloat_(page);

    }
}

When I compile this on Mac OS X using clang it understands that the switch handles all 'possible' branches and does not warn about a missing return statement (like Java). However if I run the same code through GCC 4.4.5 it always gives a missing return warning.

It's annoying because if I put in return statements then my code coverage breaks because I don't cover those 'impossible' scenarios. Is there a way for GCC to handle this like clang/javac?

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Did you try with latest GCC compiler ? –  VoidPointer Jun 15 '13 at 8:52
3  
OT: If you'd have designed your code to have only one exit point per function, you wouldn't have run into this issue. –  alk Jun 15 '13 at 8:54
    
It's not really clear in your question, but I guess that page->type is an enumeration, with only those four values listed in the switch statement? –  Joachim Pileborg Jun 15 '13 at 8:55
    
@alk, your right and that's a good idea in general but I'm more curious about if GCC even has this functionality. –  Elliot Chance Jun 15 '13 at 8:55
5  
This is C and enums are ints and therefore it is easyly possible for type to have any value an int might have. –  alk Jun 15 '13 at 8:57
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3 Answers

This sometimes happens, but it is easy to fix with a default label.

switch(page->type) {

    case EagleDataTypeInteger:
        return EaglePage_RealCopyInt_(page);

    case EagleDataTypeVarchar:
        return EaglePage_RealCopyVarchar_(page);

    case EagleDataTypeFloat:
        return EaglePage_RealCopyFloat_(page);

    case EagleDataTypeUnknown:
    default:
        EagleLogger_Log(EagleLoggerSeverityError, "Cannot page of Unknown type.");
        return NULL;

}
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I never use a default case on a switch for a enum, I rely on the compiler warning (to error) to explicitly state if I have covered every enum value. –  Elliot Chance Jun 15 '13 at 8:59
6  
As others have pointed out, it is a false sense of security. If a bug in your code puts an unexpected value in the type field, your program (with a compiler that doesn't give you the warning) will just silently cause undefined behavior on you. If you really feel it should never happen, you can assert() outside the switch. –  jxh Jun 15 '13 at 9:12
    
And add EaglePage_RealCopy(&(EaglePage){.type=0xDEADBEEF}); to your coverage tests. –  Wumpus Q. Wumbley Jun 15 '13 at 9:37
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You have not given the compiler any information to know that there are only four possible values, if for example you put switch(page->type&3) then it is up to the compiler to be smart enough to know that you have covered all the possible cases and all paths are handled (any code after the switch would be flagged as unreachable). Whether or not a compiler can do it has to do with the compiler, the specific features for that brand and version.

Having a single return point doesnt buy you anything with what you are trying to do, you still have to validate the 5 paths through this code (of which one you are saying from a system level is a cant get there). The compiler doesnt always and cant always look at the system level but sometimes can only focus at the function level. the llvm tools can easily optimize across an entire project using separately compiled source files, where gcc needs it all in one big file (with includes) to do that.

As you have written the code, the compiler will properly generate the fifth path through the code, that is what your code is telling it to do and that is what it will do unless there is a bug in the compiler. if you want the compiler to do something else then TELL the compiler to do something else by changing your source code (or show the compiler more than you have shown us, if there is code here we cannot see that is compiled with this code that is another story, or as I showed above if in this code you demonstrate to the compiler the range limit then it can have the opportunity to limit to that range).

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clang is not just a compiler, but more a hybrid of a bytecode compiler AND a static analysis tool. So the reason you do not see a warning from clang in this particular case, is that it is possible to prove that your function cannot be called with a value that is not covered by the switch.

OR it may be a bug in clang.

Try to add this function to your code, and make sure that is called, and see what happens:

void BogusEaglePage_Call(void) {
  EaglePage *bp, *br;
  bp = malloc (sizeof (*bp));
  if (bp) {
    bp->type = (EagleDataTypeInteger | EagleDataTypeVarchar | EagleDataTypeFloat | EagleDataTypeUnknown) << 2;
    br = EaglePage_RealCopy(bp);
  }
}

If clang still does not give you a warning, I suggest you report a defect.

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