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I can set up an interactive console in the middle of a Python script, as follows:

import code

a, b = 5, 7
c = [1, 2, 34]
shareVars = {'a':a, 'b':b, 'c':c}
shell = code.InteractiveConsole(shareVars)
print 'Before interacting, variables are: ', a, b, c
shell.interact('Available variables: %s' % ', '.join(shareVars.keys()))
print 'Done interacting, variables are: ', a, b, c

On pressing Ctrl+Z on windows, the session returns back to the script and prints out the values of the variables sent to the interactive session.

Now, I want to somehow communicate the modifications to the variables from the interactive session to my script. I noticed that this only seems to work for in-place modification of mutable objects in the interactive session.

For example, if I type the following in the interactive session:

>>> c.append(5)    # change will be carried over to the script
>>> c = [56, 67]  # c will remain unchanged in the original script
>>> a+=3           # a will remain unchanged in the original script

I get the following output after exiting to the main script:

Done interacting, variables are: ', 5, 7, [1, 2, 34, 5]

Is there a way to remove this distinction between in-place modification of mutable objects and all other type of changes? How do I easily pass back variables from the interactive session to the script? Do I have to go the pickle-unpickle route?

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1 Answer

up vote 3 down vote accepted

Your shareVars dictionary is the namespace the interactive shell works in; any assignments to that namespace are reflected directly in that dictionary.

If you need to round-trip certain variables, you'll need to set those variables from the shareVars dictionary:

a, b, c = shareVars['a'], shareVars['b'], shareVars['c']

Like everywhere else in Python, rebinding a variable in the interactive shell does not update other references to the old value.

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