Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I have the code of Scala

class MyClass {
  private val myData: Map[String, MyClass2] = new HashMap[String, MyClass2]()

  def someMethod = {
      synchronized(myData) {
        val id = getSomeId
        if (myData.containsKey(id)) myData = myData.remove(id)
        else Log.d("123", "Not found!")
      }
  }

  def getSomeId = //....
}

I wonder, is it possible to remain this code thread-safe without using synchronized and without involving some other libraries such Akka or any other libraries (classes) even built-in in Java or Scala?

Ideally, I'd like to make thread-safe only by using the conception of immutability (final in Java, if you will).

UPDATE:

class MyClass(myData: Map[String, MyClass2] = new HashMap[String, MyClass2]()) {

  def someMethod = {
      synchronized(myData) {
        val id = getSomeId
        if (myData.containsKey(id)) new MyClass(myData.remove(id))
        else {
           Log.d("123", "Not found!")
           this
         }
      }
  }

  def getSomeId = //....
}
share|improve this question
    
Your code doesn't compile. Are you using an immutable map? Then myData must be a var. Anyway, the answer is "no". You need either a lock or use any other concurrent tool like atomic CAS. –  0__ Jun 15 '13 at 13:09
    
@0__ look at my update, now at least it should compile. –  Marius Kavansky Jun 15 '13 at 13:26
    
You want to use path-copying there (make MyClass an immutable case class itself), as shown in the answer by Petr Pudlák. Then you move the synchronization responsibility to the instance that uses MyClass (and you can ask the question again :) –  0__ Jun 15 '13 at 15:17
    
@0__ hmm, you're right... if I understood you correctly. –  Marius Kavansky Jun 15 '13 at 15:38
    
@0__ would you mind giving me an example of what you said (move the synchronization responsibility to the instance that uses MyClass)? I'm not sure I understand the issue. –  Marius Kavansky Jun 16 '13 at 1:28
show 2 more comments

5 Answers

up vote 3 down vote accepted

You can solve the problem with immutability only if you make MyClass immutable too (and let it use only immutable data structures as well). The reason is simple: If MyClass is mutable, then you have to synchronize modifications by concurrent threads.

This requires a different design - every operation that causes an instance of MyClass to "change" will instead return a (possibly) modified instance.

import collection.immutable._

class MyClass2 {
  // ...
}

// We can make the default constructor private, if we want to manage the
// map ourselves instead of allowing users to pass arbitrary maps
// (depends on your use case):
class MyClass private (val myData: Map[String,MyClass2]) {
  // A public constructor:
  def this() = this(new HashMap[String,MyClass2]())

  def someMethod(id: String): MyClass = {
    if (myData.contains(id))
      new MyClass(myData - id) // create a new, updated instance
    else {
      println("Not found: " + id)
      this // no modification, we can return the current
            // unmodified instance
    }
  }

  // other methods for adding something to the map
  // ...
}
share|improve this answer
    
it seems this is exactly what I was looking for! –  Marius Kavansky Jun 15 '13 at 15:34
    
what does private mean here -- class MyClass private? –  Marius Kavansky Jun 15 '13 at 15:35
1  
@MariusKavansky It means that the default constructor MyClass(Map[String,Class2]) is private. So external users of the class must use new MyClass(), not new MyClass(someMyDataMap), which can be desirable, if we want complete control of the content of the map. –  Petr Pudlák Jun 15 '13 at 19:21
add comment

If you use a TrieMap from scala 2.10, which is a lock free and concurrent map implementation, you can avoid synchronizing:

import scala.collection.concurrent.TrieMap

class MyClass2

class MyClass {
    private val myData = TrieMap[String, MyClass2]()
    def someMethod = myData -= getSomeId
    def getSomeId = "id"
}
share|improve this answer
    
But he has two subsequent calls, containsKey and remove. So if you want to have that thread safe without locking / CAS, you must use immutable structures up to and including MyClass. If you add containsKey here, you still have a race condition. –  0__ Jun 15 '13 at 15:14
add comment

I would recommend using a library, because getting concurrency right on your own is hard. You could for example use a concurrent map like TrieMap. See the answer above.

But let's assume that you want to do this manually for educational purposes. The first step to make the above thread-safe would be to use an immutable collection. So instead of

private val myData: Map[String, MyClass2] = new HashMap[String, MyClass2]()

you would use

private var myData = Map.empty[String, MyClass2] 

(Even though there is a var here, this has less mutable state than the version above. In this case the only mutable thing is a single reference, whereas in the example above the entire collection is mutable)

Now you have to deal with the var. You have to make sure that an update to the var on one thread is "seen" on all other threads. So you have to mark the field as @volatile. That would be enough if you have a publish/subscribe scenario where writes are only done from one thread. But assuming that you want to both read and write from different threads, you will need to use synchronized for all write accesses.

Clearly, this is enough complexity to warrant introducing a little helper class:

final class SyncronizedRef[T](initial:T) {
  @volatile private var current = initial

  def get:T = current

  def update(f:T=>T) {
    this synchronized {
      current = f(current)
    }
  }
}

With this little helper, the code from above can be implemented like this:

class MyClass {
  val state = new SyncronizedRef(Map.empty[String, MyClass2])

  def someMethod = {
    state.update(myData =>
      val id = getSomeId
      if (myData.containsKey(id)) 
        myData - id
      else { 
        Log.d("123", "Not found!")
        myData
      }
  }

  def getSomeId = //....
}

This would be thread-safe as far as the map is concerned. However, whether the whole thing is threadsafe depends on whatever happens in getSomeID.

In general, this way of dealing with concurrency will work as long as the thing passed to update is a pure function that just transforms the data without having any side effects. If your state is more complex than a single map, it can be quite challenging to write your updates in a purely functional style.

There are still low level multithreading primitives in the SynchronizedRef, but the logic of your program is completely free of them. You just describe how the state of your program changes in response to external input by composing pure functions.

In any case, the best solution for this particular example is just to use an existing concurrent map implementation.

share|improve this answer
    
it seems you have done a lot of work, but nonetheless that's not what I'm looking for -- I'd like to make thread-safe only by using the conception of immutability –  Marius Kavansky Jun 15 '13 at 14:02
    
besides, it involves synchronized operator, which is also I'd like to avoid. However, yes, I need an example made manually for educational purposes. –  Marius Kavansky Jun 15 '13 at 14:04
    
There is no way to avoid using low level synchronization primitives somewhere or use libraries that do it for you. You have to tell the CPU that a write needs to be visible on the other CPUs. But note that the actual logic (the transform function) is free from low level synchronization. –  Rüdiger Klaehn Jun 15 '13 at 14:08
    
as Peter has shown, it's possible not to use synchronized keyword. Isn't that so? –  Marius Kavansky Jun 15 '13 at 14:44
add comment

Whenever you share mutable state, you need a concurrency mechanism. As Rüdiger points out, the best is to identify which kind of concurrency scenario you have, and then use an existing tool that best addresses that scenario:

  • plain old Java synchronized locks
  • atomic compare-and-swap
  • software transactional memory (e.g. Scala-STM)
  • message-passing / actors

Or of course, you could use cooperative multitasking (run concurrent processes on a single shared thread), if you don't need highest possible performance.

If the state of your class is overseeable, you can make that class completely immutable, e.g.:

case class MyClass2()

case class MyClass(myData: Map[String, MyClass2] = Map.empty) {
  def someMethod = {
    val id = getSomeId
    if (myData.contains(id)) copy(myData = myData - id)
    else throw new IllegalArgumentException(s"Key $id not found")
  }

  def getSomeId = "foo" // ...
}

An instance of MyClass is only mutated by copying the data to a new instance, so multiple threads can safely refer to the same instance. But on the other hand, if two threads A and B start off with the same instance foo1, and either of them mutates it and wants that mutation to be seen by the other thread, then you need to share that mutated state again in some form (use an STM ref cell, send a message via an actor, store it in a synchronized variable etc.)

val foo1 = MyClass(Map("foo" -> MyClass2()))
val foo2 = foo1.someMethod  // foo1 is untouched
share|improve this answer
    
what's copy method? –  Marius Kavansky Jun 16 '13 at 9:33
    
please explain what you meant by this Then you move the synchronization responsibility to the instance that uses MyClass (and you can ask the question again :). I can't figure it out. With an example if it's not a big deal. –  Marius Kavansky Jun 16 '13 at 9:35
    
See this post for example. It is just a convenience to create a new instance of a case class where some arguments are replaced. In this case, where there is only one argument (myData), it doesn't buy you much. You could equally say MyClass(myData - id) –  0__ Jun 16 '13 at 9:36
    
You see, you had foo1, now you have foo2 with the changed content. You could have said var foo = MyClass(...); foo = foo.someMethod, replacing the contents of that variable. Now you are going to access foo from somewhere in your code. If that may happen from different threads, you need again to ensure that they are playing nicely together if they wish to update foo. So you just moved your concurrency concerns to a different spot. –  0__ Jun 16 '13 at 9:39
add comment

Thread-safety is about two things, state share and visibility (i.e. happens-before). Demanding any of these requires synchronization, no matter the types (locks, synchronized, Actors, etc.) or places (in data structure, user class, or elsewhere) one would actually take. And one can avoid synchronization only if none of these is demanded.

The code given by Petr Pudlák, indeed thread-safe and that suit your need, actually demands neither state share nor happens-before. For example, you can have an instance x of MyClass in Thread A. When another Thread B calls the someMethod of x, you have one new instance y of MyClass, right due to x is immutable. Then Thread C does something with the instance x as well and gives a z instance of MyClass. Neither what B and C have done to instance x is shared between the three threads , nor any happens-before requirement did we put on the construction of y and z. Such facts makes the effort for an immutability-only solution totally useless. Should the construction of y must be aware by Thread C, or y must comes before z, then synchronization of a certain form is unavoidable. This situation resembles local caches in distributed web servers, where each holds its own cache for user accessed pages.

What's more, concurrent.TrieMap is just a concurrent immutable data structure. This means different threads can operate on the same underlying "mutable" tree, but this is not state share, because immutability means the operations by thread B, generating a y instance of MyClass, has nothing to do with the concurrent operations by Thread C. Once again, if the operations by Thread B must be broadcasted to Thread C, then what we need here is actually a mutable ConcurrentHashMap, where synchronizations are inherently made.

share|improve this answer
add comment

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.