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I need to get the first N sentences from a text where the last char of the sentence can be a period, a colon, or a semicolon. For example, given this text:

Lorem ipsum, dolor sit amet. consectetur adipisicing elit; sed do eiusmod tempor.
incididunt ut labore: et dolore magna aliqua. Ut enim ad. minim veniam.

The first 4 sentences would be,

Lorem ipsum, dolor sit amet. consectetur adipisicing elit; sed do eiusmod tempor.
incididunt ut labore:

Currently, my code is splitting the string using .,:, and ; as the delimiter and then join the results.

import re
sentences = re.split('\. |: |;', text)
summary = ' '.join(sentences[:4])

But it will remove the delimiters from the result. I'm open to regex or basic string manipulation.

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1  
How would you deal with: For e.g., It's 5 A.M. in the morning here and my C.D. isn't working very well etc. etc; are you O.K. with this?? –  Ben Jun 15 '13 at 14:00
    
@Ben yes, there are "special cases" and the result is acceptable. It doesn't have to be totally perfect. –  bsdnoobz Jun 15 '13 at 14:02

4 Answers 4

up vote 4 down vote accepted
>>> import re
>>> text = "Lorem ipsum, dolor sit amet. consectetur adipisicing elit; sed do eiusmod tempor. incididunt ut labore: et dolore magna aliqua. Ut enim ad. minim veniam."
>>> ' '.join(re.split(r'(?<=[.:;])\s', text)[:4])
'Lorem ipsum, dolor sit amet. consectetur adipisicing elit; sed do eiusmod tempor. incididunt ut labore:'

Something like this would be more efficient, adjust to your needs by formatting the 4:

>>> re.match(r'(?:[^.:;]+[.:;]){4}', text).group()
'Lorem ipsum, dolor sit amet. consectetur adipisicing elit; sed do eiusmod tempor. incididunt ut labore:'
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It works, thanks! would you mind explaining both regex? –  bsdnoobz Jun 15 '13 at 14:12
    
The two regexes are not equivalent. The first only splits on punctuation + space, while the second splits on punctuation(which, I believe, is what the OP wanted). –  Bakuriu Jun 15 '13 at 14:12
    
+1 the second one is nice. –  Ashwini Chaudhary Jun 15 '13 at 14:15
    
@bsdnoobz The first splits on a space that's preceded by punctuation, it was really just a fix of your code. The second one simply finds a pattern using a non capturing group (?:...), which consists of 1 or more non punctuation letters followed by a punctuation. This group is repeated 4 times –  jamylak Jun 15 '13 at 14:15

Could couple re.finditer with itertools.islice, and string slicing (to avoid joining back and keeping the delimiter):

import re
from itertools import islice

delims = re.finditer('[.:;]', s)
try:
    print s[:next(islice(delims, 3, None)).end()]
except StopIteration:
    print s # whole string instead maybe as there's not enough delimiters
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+1 This is kinda neat but I'm, guessing it's slower than plain regex match –  jamylak Jun 15 '13 at 14:13
    
@jamylak it's likely to be slower - can't say I've timed it. I just think it's arguably more readable without capture groups and joins and other bits and bobs... (besides - you'd already taken that answer :)) –  Jon Clements Jun 15 '13 at 14:16

So, I know this question was about using regex to find sentences, but, for the same reason that regex is not the right choice for parsing html, (different classes of grammars), regex is an even worse choice for problems that involve Natural Language.

If your goal is to actually delineate sentences you've got to look for other tools. Personally I would recommend the Punkt sentence tokenizer provided by nltk. Below is an example showing why this is a fundamentally better choice than regex for this task.

Punkt knows that the periods in Mr. Smith and Johann S. Bach do not mark 
sentence boundaries.  And sometimes sentences can start with non-capitalized 
words.  i is a good variable name.

http://nltk.org/api/nltk.tokenize.html for more info.

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+1 for using nltk - it's not perfect, but it does a surprisingly good job of detecting the end of sentences. –  Aya Jun 15 '13 at 15:14
import re
sentenceEnd = re.compile('[.!?][\s]{1,2}(?=[A-Z])')
sentenceLists = sentenceEnd.split(text, re.UNICODE)

The above aproach can be used, what it will do is look for a period, and make sure that the next character after that is an uppercase letter and there is a space in between the period and the next letter, this will take care of cases such as A.M. .The text is basically where your original text will be and it will make sure it it unicoded.

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