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I want to populate an array that has an integer and a hash, something like:

my_a=[Integer,{}]

then for example I am trying to have:

my_a[5,{:direction=>'up'}]
my_a[5,{:speed=>'fast'}]
my_a[3,{:direction=>'up'}]
my_a[3,{:speed=>'slow'}]

but I get

ArgumentError: wrong number of arguments(2 for 1)

How do I set my_a to have an entry for 5 with :direction => 'up'?

Maybe the whole thing should be a hash?

Trying to find someway to store this:

[0,{:top => ' ―― '},{:top_mid => '|__|'},{:bot_mid => '|  |'},{:bot => '――'}]
[1,{:top => ' ―― '},{:top_mid => '|__|'},{:bot_mid => '|  |'},{:bot => '――'}]
[2,{:top => ' ―― '},{:top_mid => '|__|'},{:bot_mid => '|  |'},{:bot => '――'}]
share|improve this question

closed as not a real question by sawa, Phrogz, bensiu, the Tin Man, Dom Jun 15 '13 at 19:49

It's difficult to tell what is being asked here. This question is ambiguous, vague, incomplete, overly broad, or rhetorical and cannot be reasonably answered in its current form. For help clarifying this question so that it can be reopened, visit the help center.If this question can be reworded to fit the rules in the help center, please edit the question.

1  
This argument error means that you are passing two arguments inside a block that only takes one argument. – David Jun 15 '13 at 14:31
3  
When you state "an entry for 5", are you intending to fetch the hash {:direction=>'up'} if you ask for the value indexed by number 5? Because that is just a regular array my_a[5] = {:direction=>'up'} . . . what is different about your requirement? – Neil Slater Jun 15 '13 at 14:31
2  
my_a[...] is an array access. Array#[int, hash] is indeed not defined. That doesn't prevent you from using [int, hash] as an array literal: my_a = [5, {:direction => :up}] – Jan Dvorak Jun 15 '13 at 14:34
1  
What are you trying to do? – Jan Dvorak Jun 15 '13 at 14:37
    
Added more info – junky Jun 15 '13 at 14:44
up vote 4 down vote accepted

I think you're looking for an array of hashes. Alternatively, if the numeric indices are not consecutive, a hash of hashes.

To create such an array, you can use an array literal ([...]) with hash literals ({...}) inside:

my_arr = [
  {:top => 'top0', :bot => 'bot0'},
  {:top => 'top1', :bot => 'bot1'}
]

(whitespace optional). Then my_arr[0] will refer to the first hash (with top0 and bot0 inside), and my_arr[1] will refer to the second hash. my_arr[0][:bot] will refer to the :bot value in the first hash, bot0.

Note that my_arr[2][:bot] will raise an exception since my_arr[2] is nil. Make sure to include any neccessary checks if you're accessing by an index.

See:

share|improve this answer

You wrote:

Trying to find someway to store this:

[0,{:top => ' ―― '},{:top_mid => '|__|'},{:bot_mid => '|  |'},{:bot => '――'}]
[1,{:top => ' ―― '},{:top_mid => '|__|'},{:bot_mid => '|  |'},{:bot => '――'}]
[2,{:top => ' ―― '},{:top_mid => '|__|'},{:bot_mid => '|  |'},{:bot => '――'}]

I don't think that's what you really want. What you show there is a discrete set of arrays, each of which has a single integer and a bunch of one-element hashes. I think you really want this:

a = [
  {:top => ' ―― ', :top_mid => '|__|', :bot_mid => '|  |', :bot => '――'},
  {:top => ' ―― ', :top_mid => '|__|', :bot_mid => '|  |', :bot => '――'},
  {:top => ' ―― ', :top_mid => '|__|', :bot_mid => '|  |', :bot => '――'}
]

With the above structure data, you can ask for items by index and name like so:

puts a[1][:top] #=> ' ―― '

You can create this either directly like I showed above, or you can add to it like so:

a = [] # Just an array; the contents are arbitrary

# Add an entire row at once…
a[0] = {:top => ' ―― ', :top_mid => '|__|', :bot_mid => '|  |', :bot => '――'}

# …or add to it piecemeal
a[1] = {} # An empty hash, waiting to be filled
a[1][:top] = ' ―― '
a[1][:bot] = ' ―― '
# et cetera

Note that if you do not know the index of each entry directly, but just want to add rows to the end, you can do:

a << {} # push this hash onto the end of the array
a.last[:top] = ' ―― '
# and so on
share|improve this answer
    
+1. I agree. The OP's original structure doesn't smell good and looks like it'd take some gnarly code to access/process it. – the Tin Man Jun 15 '13 at 16:53

You are trying to store an hash with values of arrays of hashes. Try this:

my_a = {}
my_a[0] = [{:top => ' ―― '},{:top_mid => '|__|'},{:bot_mid => '|  |'},{:bot => '――'}]
my_a[1] = [{:top => ' ―― '},{:top_mid => '|__|'},{:bot_mid => '|  |'},{:bot => '――'}]
my_a[2] = [{:top => ' ―― '},{:top_mid => '|__|'},{:bot_mid => '|  |'},{:bot => '――'}]

Unless you want a hash of hashes...

my_a = {}
my_a[0] = {:top => ' ―― ', :top_mid => '|__|', :bot_mid => '|  |', :bot => '――'}
my_a[1] = {:top => ' ―― ', :top_mid => '|__|', :bot_mid => '|  |', :bot => '――'}
my_a[2] = {:top => ' ―― ', :top_mid => '|__|', :bot_mid => '|  |', :bot => '――'}

Also remember that Ruby is dynamically typed, and you can't declare the type stored in an array or hash.

share|improve this answer
    
This would be a hash of arrays of one-element hashes. I don't think OP wants that. – Jan Dvorak Jun 15 '13 at 15:12
    
@JanDvorak: What does he want? (I have very little idea...) – Linuxios Jun 15 '13 at 15:14
    
I think he wants an array of hashes (an array of Objects is also fine) – Jan Dvorak Jun 15 '13 at 15:16
    
@JanDvorak: I think he wants a foo of bars with consecutive bazzes in different universes. You seem to understand him better than I do. ;) – Linuxios Jun 15 '13 at 15:17
    
You seem to base your understanding on the code. I'm trying to base mine on the words and the data presented in the code (not its structure) – Jan Dvorak Jun 15 '13 at 15:18

Seems like you want to store a specific structure in an array or in a hash. If you don't want to create a class for that, you can use OpenStruct:

require 'ostruct'
item = OpenStruct.new(top: ' ―― ', top_mid: '|__|', bot_mid: '|  |', bot: '――')
#=> #<OpenStruct top=" ―― ", top_mid="|__|", bot_mid="|  |", bot="――">, 1=>#<OpenStruct top=" ―― ", top_mid="|__|", bot_mid="|  |", bot="――">

You can get and set the attributes like this:

item.top                    # get "top" value
# => ' ―― '

item.top = "other value"    # set "top" value

Multiple items can be stored in an array:

array = []   # shortcut for Array.new

10.times { |index|
  array << OpenStruct.new(top: ' ―― ', top_mid: '|__|', bot_mid: '|  |', bot: '――')
}

array        #=> [<OpenStruct ...>, 2=>#<OpenStruct ...>, ...]
array[0]     #=> <OpenStruct ...>
array[0].top #=> ' ―― '

Or in a hash with numeric keys:

hash = {}    # shortcut for Hash.new

1.upto(10) { |index|
  hash[index] = OpenStruct.new(top: ' ―― ', top_mid: '|__|', bot_mid: '|  |', bot: '――')
}

hash         #=> {1=>#<OpenStruct ...>, 2=>#<OpenStruct ...>, ...}
hash[1]      #=> <OpenStruct ...>
hash[1].top  #=> ' ―― '
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