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I need to be able to merge two (very simple) JavaScript objects at runtime. For example I'd like to:

var obj1 = { food: 'pizza', car: 'ford' }
var obj2 = { animal: 'dog' }

obj1.merge(obj2);

//obj1 now has three properties: food, car, and animal

Does anyone have a script for this or know of a built in way to do this? I do not need recursion, and I do not need to merge functions, just methods on flat objects.

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33 Answers

up vote 430 down vote accepted
for (var attrname in obj2) { obj1[attrname] = obj2[attrname]; }

Note that this will simply add all attributes of obj2 to obj1 which might not be what you want if you still want to use the unmodified obj1.

If you're using a framework that craps all over your prototypes then you have to get fancier with checks like hasOwnProperty, but that code will work for 99% of cases.

Example function:

/**
 * Overwrites obj1's values with obj2's and adds obj2's if non existent in obj1
 * @param obj1
 * @param obj2
 * @returns obj3 a new object based on obj1 and obj2
 */
function merge_options(obj1,obj2){
    var obj3 = {};
    for (var attrname in obj1) { obj3[attrname] = obj1[attrname]; }
    for (var attrname in obj2) { obj3[attrname] = obj2[attrname]; }
    return obj3;
}
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20  
Okay, kids, keep it down in here, pls. –  Will Jul 20 '10 at 15:38
4  
This doesn't work if objects have same name attributes, and you would also want to merge the attributes. –  Xiè Jìléi Oct 24 '10 at 10:56
6  
This only does a shallow copy/merge. Has the potential to clobber a lot of elements. –  Jay Taylor Jun 2 '11 at 15:39
8  
agreeing to pyrony, this will produce very unexpected results when using nested structures. i think markus (below) posted the better solution. –  kritzikratzi Oct 11 '11 at 17:20
5  
This is awful, and the caveats aren't explained (shallow copy only). This should be downvoted heavily. –  Nick Nov 27 '13 at 15:18
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jQuery also has a utility for this: http://api.jquery.com/jQuery.extend/.

Taken from the jQuery documentation:

// merge options object into settings object
var settings = { validate: false, limit: 5, name: "foo" };
var options  = { validate: true, name: "bar" };
jQuery.extend(settings, options);
// now the content of settings object is the following:
// { validate: true, limit: 5, name: "bar" }

EDIT: (based on comment by @webmat)

The above code will mutate the object named settings.

If you want to create a new object without modifying either argument, use this:

var defaults = { validate: false, limit: 5, name: "foo" };
var options = { validate: true, name: "bar" };

/* merge defaults and options, without modifying defaults */
var settings = $.extend({}, defaults, options);
// the content of settings variable is now the following:
// {validate: true, limit: 5, name: "bar"}
// defaults and options variable remained the same
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83  
Gosh that is named poorly. Very unlikely to find it when searching for how to merge objects. –  Gregory Aug 12 '10 at 1:27
97  
Careful: the variable "settings" will be modified, though. jQuery doesn't return a new instance. The reason for this (and for the naming) is that .extend() was developed to extend objects, rather than to munge stuff together. If you want a new object (e.g. settings is defaults you don't want to touch), you can always jQuery.extend({}, settings, options); –  webmat May 4 '11 at 16:01
16  
Mind you, jQuery.extend also has a deep (boolean) setting. jQuery.extend(true,settings,override), which is important if a property in settings holds an object and override only has part of that object. Instead of removing the unmatched properties, the deep setting will only update where it exists. The default is false. –  vol7ron Jun 9 '11 at 21:09
10  
similarly, if you're using underscore.js there's underscorejs.org/#extend –  twmulloy Jun 20 '12 at 17:39
2  
Gee willikers, they really did a good job naming this. If you search for how to extend a Javascript object it comes right up! You might not hit upon it though if you are trying to fuse or stitch together Javascript objects. –  Derek Greer May 20 at 18:43
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I googled for code to merge object properties and ended up here. However since there wasn't any code for recursive merge I wrote it myself. (Maybe jQuery extend is recursive BTW?) Anyhow, hopefully someone else will find it useful as well.

(Now the code does not use Object.prototype :)

Code

/*
* Recursively merge properties of two objects 
*/
function MergeRecursive(obj1, obj2) {

  for (var p in obj2) {
    try {
      // Property in destination object set; update its value.
      if ( obj2[p].constructor==Object ) {
        obj1[p] = MergeRecursive(obj1[p], obj2[p]);

      } else {
        obj1[p] = obj2[p];

      }

    } catch(e) {
      // Property in destination object not set; create it and set its value.
      obj1[p] = obj2[p];

    }
  }

  return obj1;
}

An example

o1 = {  a : 1,
        b : 2,
        c : {
          ca : 1,
          cb : 2,
          cc : {
            cca : 100,
            ccb : 200 } } };

o2 = {  a : 10,
        c : {
          ca : 10,
          cb : 20, 
          cc : {
            cca : 101,
            ccb : 202 } } };

o3 = MergeRecursive(o1, o2);

Produces object o3 like

o3 = {  a : 10,
        b : 2,
        c : {
          ca : 10,
          cb : 20,
          cc : { 
            cca : 101,
            ccb : 202 } } };
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2  
ooh extending the Object's prototype...very, very bad! erik.eae.net/archives/2005/06/06/22.13.54 <= for more info –  Andreas Grech Dec 21 '08 at 13:19
3  
Dreas, good point, thanks for pointing it out. Actually I noticed the disadvantage with Object.prototype so actually I simply rewrote the code as a function with two arguments. This should work, don't you think? There is always something new to learn :) –  Markus Dec 23 '08 at 0:32
8  
For future visitors - JQuery has had a recursive extend() since 1.1.4. jQuery.extend( [deep], target, object1, [objectN] ) - from api.jquery.com/jQuery.extend . –  Matt Luongo Oct 20 '10 at 22:01
2  
Nice, but I would make a deepcopy of the objects first. This way o1 would be modified too, as objects are passed by reference. –  skerit Jan 16 '11 at 16:00
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Altough this is an old question, I thought that it would be appropriate to note that underscore.js's extend-method does this in a one-liner:

_.extend({name : 'moe'}, {age : 50});
=> {name : 'moe', age : 50}
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14  
This example is fine as you're dealing with anonymous objects, but if this is not the case then webmat's comment in the jQuery answer warning about mutations applies here, as underscore also mutates the destination object. Like the jQuery answer, to do this mutation-free just merge into an empty object: _({}).extend(obj1, obj2); –  Abe Voelker Jun 5 '12 at 18:12
4  
There's another one that might be of relevance depending on what you're trying to achieve: _.defaults(object, *defaults) "Fill in null and undefined properties in object with values from the defaults objects, and return the object." –  conny Dec 10 '12 at 16:08
1  
_ for the win. Seriously though. This is an awesome package and makes everything easier and very functional. –  meawoppl Jun 12 '13 at 17:50
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Similar to JQuery extend(), you have the same function in Angular JS

// merge options object into settings object
var settings = { validate: false, limit: 5, name: "foo" };
var options  = { validate: true, name: "bar" };
angular.extend(settings, options);
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The given solutions should be modified to check source.hasOwnProperty(property) in the for..in loops before assigning - otherwise, you end up copying the properties of the whole prototype chain, which is rarely desired...

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I need merge objects today and this question (and answers) helped me a lot. I tried some of the answers but none of them fit my needs, so I combined some of the answers, added something myself and came up with a new merge function. Here it is:

var merge = function() {
    var obj = {},
        i = 0,
        il = arguments.length,
        key;
    for (; i < il; i++) {
        for (key in arguments[i]) {
            if (arguments[i].hasOwnProperty(key)) {
                obj[key] = arguments[i][key];
            }
        }
    }
    return obj;
};

Some example usages:

var t1 = {
    key1: 1,
    key2: "test",
    key3: [5, 2, 76, 21]
};
var t2 = {
    key1: {
        ik1: "hello",
        ik2: "world",
        ik3: 3
    }
};
var t3 = {
    key2: 3,
    key3: {
        t1: 1,
        t2: 2,
        t3: {
            a1: 1,
            a2: 3,
            a4: [21, 3, 42, "asd"]
        }
    }
};
console.log(merge(t1, t2));
console.log(merge(t1, t3));
console.log(merge(t2, t3));
console.log(merge(t1, t2, t3));
console.log(merge({}, t1, { key1: 1 }));
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4  
This is a great answer! It is just like the jQuery source code! –  Progo Jan 18 at 13:56
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The best way for you to do this is to add a proper property that is non-enumerable using Object.defineProperty.

This way you will still be able to iterate over your objects properties without having the newly created "extend" that you would get if you were to create the property with Object.prototype.extend.

Hopefully this helps:

Object.defineProperty(Object.prototype, "extend", {
    enumerable: false,
    value: function(from) {
        var props = Object.getOwnPropertyNames(from);
        var dest = this;
        props.forEach(function(name) {
            if (name in dest) {
                var destination = Object.getOwnPropertyDescriptor(from, name);
                Object.defineProperty(dest, name, destination);
            }
        });
        return this;
    }
});

Once you have that working, you can do:

var obj = {
    name: 'stack',
    finish: 'overflow'
}
var replacement = {
    name: 'stock'
};

obj.extend(replacement);

I just wrote a blog post about it here: http://onemoredigit.com/post/1527191998/extending-objects-in-node-js

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1  
This unfortunately only works in newer browsers. –  Emil Stenström Dec 20 '11 at 9:58
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prototype.js has this:

Object.extend = function(destination,source) {
    for (var property in source)
        destination[property] = source[property];
    return destination;
}

obj1.extend(obj2) will do what you want.

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2  
You meant Object.prototype.extend? In any case, it's not a good idea to extend Object.prototype. -1. –  SolutionYogi Jul 31 '09 at 20:08
1  
I don't mean to harp on you but saying that it's okie because prototype.js does is a poor argument. Prototype.js is popular but it doesn't mean that they are the role model on how to do JavaScript. Check this detailed review of Prototype library by a JS pro. dhtmlkitchen.com/?category=/JavaScript/&date=2008/06/17/… –  SolutionYogi Jul 31 '09 at 21:19
2  
Who care's if its right or wrong? If it works then it works. Waiting around for the perfect solution is great except when trying to keep a contract, win new clients, or meet deadlines. Give anyone here who's passionate about programming free money and they'll eventually do everything the "right" way. –  David Aug 19 '09 at 4:24
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In ExtJS 4 it can be done as follows:

var mergedObject = Ext.Object.merge(object1, object2)

//or shorter:
var mergedObject2 = Ext.merge(object1, object2)

See http://docs.sencha.com/ext-js/4-0/#/api/Ext.Object-method-merge

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Just if anyone is using Google Closure Library: http://closure-library.googlecode.com/svn/docs/closure_goog_object_object.js.html

goog.require('goog.object');
var a = {'a': 1, 'b': 2};
var b = {'b': 3, 'c': 4};
goog.object.extend(a, b);
// now object a == {'a': 1, 'b': 3, 'c': 4};

Similar helper function exists for array: http://closure-library.googlecode.com/svn/docs/closure_goog_array_array.js.html

var a = [1, 2];
var b = [3, 4];
goog.array.extend(a, b); // extends array a
goog.array.concat(a, b); // returns concatenation of array a and b
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I extended David Coallier's method:

  • Added the possibility to merge multiple objects
  • Supports deep objects
  • override parameter (that's detected if the last parameter is a boolean)

If override is false, no property gets overridden but new properties will be added.

Usage: obj.merge(merges... [, override]);

Here is my code:

Object.defineProperty(Object.prototype, "merge", {
    enumerable: false,
    value: function () {
        var override = true,
            dest = this,
            len = arguments.length,
            props, merge, i, from;

        if (typeof(arguments[arguments.length - 1]) === "boolean") {
            override = arguments[arguments.length - 1];
            len = arguments.length - 1;
        }

        for (i = 0; i < len; i++) {
            from = arguments[i];
            if (from != null) {
                Object.getOwnPropertyNames(from).forEach(function (name) {
                    var descriptor;

                    // nesting
                    if ((typeof(dest[name]) === "object" || typeof(dest[name]) === "undefined")
                            && typeof(from[name]) === "object") {

                        // ensure proper types (Array rsp Object)
                        if (typeof(dest[name]) === "undefined") {
                            dest[name] = Array.isArray(from[name]) ? [] : {};
                        }
                        if (override) {
                            if (!Array.isArray(dest[name]) && Array.isArray(from[name])) {
                                dest[name] = [];
                            }
                            else if (Array.isArray(dest[name]) && !Array.isArray(from[name])) {
                                dest[name] = {};
                            }
                        }
                        dest[name].merge(from[name], override);
                    } 

                    // flat properties
                    else if ((name in dest && override) || !(name in dest)) {
                        descriptor = Object.getOwnPropertyDescriptor(from, name);
                        if (descriptor.configurable) {
                            Object.defineProperty(dest, name, descriptor);
                        }
                    }
                });
            }
        }
        return this;
    }
});

Examples and TestCases:

function clone (obj) {
    return JSON.parse(JSON.stringify(obj));
}
var obj = {
    name : "trick",
    value : "value"
};

var mergeObj = {
    name : "truck",
    value2 : "value2"
};

var mergeObj2 = {
    name : "track",
    value : "mergeObj2",
    value2 : "value2-mergeObj2",
    value3 : "value3"
};

assertTrue("Standard", clone(obj).merge(mergeObj).equals({
    name : "truck",
    value : "value",
    value2 : "value2"
}));

assertTrue("Standard no Override", clone(obj).merge(mergeObj, false).equals({
    name : "trick",
    value : "value",
    value2 : "value2"
}));

assertTrue("Multiple", clone(obj).merge(mergeObj, mergeObj2).equals({
    name : "track",
    value : "mergeObj2",
    value2 : "value2-mergeObj2",
    value3 : "value3"
}));

assertTrue("Multiple no Override", clone(obj).merge(mergeObj, mergeObj2, false).equals({
    name : "trick",
    value : "value",
    value2 : "value2",
    value3 : "value3"
}));

var deep = {
    first : {
        name : "trick",
        val : "value"
    },
    second : {
        foo : "bar"
    }
};

var deepMerge = {
    first : {
        name : "track",
        anotherVal : "wohoo"
    },
    second : {
        foo : "baz",
        bar : "bam"
    },
    v : "on first layer"
};

assertTrue("Deep merges", clone(deep).merge(deepMerge).equals({
    first : {
        name : "track",
        val : "value",
        anotherVal : "wohoo"
    },
    second : {
        foo : "baz",
        bar : "bam"
    },
    v : "on first layer"
}));

assertTrue("Deep merges no override", clone(deep).merge(deepMerge, false).equals({
    first : {
        name : "trick",
        val : "value",
        anotherVal : "wohoo"
    },
    second : {
        foo : "bar",
        bar : "bam"
    },
    v : "on first layer"
}));

var obj1 = {a: 1, b: "hello"};
obj1.merge({c: 3});
assertTrue(obj1.equals({a: 1, b: "hello", c: 3}));

obj1.merge({a: 2, b: "mom", d: "new property"}, false);
assertTrue(obj1.equals({a: 1, b: "hello", c: 3, d: "new property"}));

var obj2 = {};
obj2.merge({a: 1}, {b: 2}, {a: 3});
assertTrue(obj2.equals({a: 3, b: 2}));

var a = [];
var b = [1, [2, 3], 4];
a.merge(b);
assertEquals(1, a[0]);
assertEquals([2, 3], a[1]);
assertEquals(4, a[2]);


var o1 = {};
var o2 = {a: 1, b: {c: 2}};
var o3 = {d: 3};
o1.merge(o2, o3);
assertTrue(o1.equals({a: 1, b: {c: 2}, d: 3}));
o1.b.c = 99;
assertTrue(o2.equals({a: 1, b: {c: 2}}));

// checking types with arrays and objects
var bo;
a = [];
bo = [1, {0:2, 1:3}, 4];
b = [1, [2, 3], 4];

a.merge(b);
assertTrue("Array stays Array?", Array.isArray(a[1]));

a = [];
a.merge(bo);
assertTrue("Object stays Object?", !Array.isArray(a[1]));

a = [];
a.merge(b);
a.merge(bo);
assertTrue("Object overrides Array", !Array.isArray(a[1]));

a = [];
a.merge(b);
a.merge(bo, false);
assertTrue("Object does not override Array", Array.isArray(a[1]));

a = [];
a.merge(bo);
a.merge(b);
assertTrue("Array overrides Object", Array.isArray(a[1]));

a = [];
a.merge(bo);
a.merge(b, false);
assertTrue("Array does not override Object", !Array.isArray(a[1]));

My equals method can be found here: Object comparison in JavaScript

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For not too complicated objects you could use JSON:

var obj1 = { food: 'pizza', car: 'ford' }
var obj2 = { animal: 'dog', car: 'chevy'}
var objMerge;

objMerge = JSON.stringify(obj1) + JSON.stringify(obj2);
            // {"food": "pizza","car":"ford"}{"animal":"dog","car":"chevy"}
objMerge = objMerge.replace(/\}\{/, ""); //  \_ replace with comma for valid JSON

objMerge = JSON.parse(objMerge); // { food: 'pizza', animal: 'dog', car: 'chevy'}
// of same keys in both objects, the last object's value is retained_/

!!! Mind that in this example "}{" MUST NOT OCCUR within a string!!!

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6  
Woah, that'd probably work most of the time, but it almost stopped my heart there for a second. –  Benjamin Oakes Jan 10 '11 at 16:18
2  
amazing! it made me giggle a bit. even though this is highly problematic and even though i downvoted it --- i think this solution has it's charm :) –  kritzikratzi Oct 11 '11 at 17:18
3  
this solution is very dangerous but fun –  Charles Apr 25 '12 at 10:01
1  
var so1 = JSON.stringify(obj1); var so2 = JSON.stringify(obj1); objMerge = so1.substr(0, so1.length-1)+","+so2.substr(1); console.info(objMerge); –  Quamis Sep 3 '13 at 10:55
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Based on Markus and vsync answer, this is an expanded version. Function takes any number of arguments. It can be used to set properties on DOM Nodes and makes deep copies of values. However, first argument is given by reference.

To to detect a DOM node isDOMNode() function is used (see http://stackoverflow.com/a/8736129/1131084)

Tested in Opera 11, FireFox 6, Internet Explorer 8 and Google Chrome 16.

Code

function mergeRecursive() {
  // _mergeRecursive does the actual job with two arguments.
  var _mergeRecursive = function (dst, src) {
    if ( isDOMNode(src) || typeof src!=='object' || src===null) {
      return dst; 
    }

    for ( var p in src ) {
      if( !src.hasOwnProperty(p) ) continue;
      if ( src[p]===undefined ) continue;
      if ( typeof src[p]!=='object' || src[p]===null) {
        dst[p] = src[p];
      } else if ( typeof dst[p]!=='object' || dst[p]===null ) {
        dst[p] = _mergeRecursive(src[p].constructor===Array ? [] : {}, src[p]); 
      } else {              
        _mergeRecursive(dst[p], src[p]);
      }
    }
    return dst;
  }

  // Loop through arguments and merge them into the first argument. 
  var out = arguments[0];
  if ( typeof out!=='object' || out===null) return out;
  for ( var i=1, il=arguments.length; i<il; i++ ) {
    _mergeRecursive(out, arguments[i]);
  }
  return out;
}

Some examples

Set innerHTML and style of a HTML Element

mergeRecursive(
  document.getElementById('mydiv'),
  {style:{border:'5px solid green',color:'red'}}, 
  {innerHTML:'Hello world!'});

Merge arrays and objects. Note that undefined can be used to preserv values in the lefthand array/object.

o = mergeRecursive({a:'a'}, [1,2,3], [undefined, null, [30,31]], {a:undefined, b:'b'});
// o = {0:1, 1:null, 2:[30,31], a:'a', b:'b'}

Any argument not beeing a javascript object (including null) will be ignored. Except for the first argument, also DOM nodes are discarded. Beware that i.e. strings, created like new String() are in fact objects.

o = mergeRecursive({a:'a'}, 1, true, null, undefined, [1,2,3], 'bc', new String('de'));
// o = {0:'d', 1:'e', 2:3, a:'a'}

If you want to merge two objects into a new (without affecting any of the two) supply {} as first argument

var a={}, b={b:'abc'}, c={c:'cde'}, o;
o = mergeRecursive(a, b, c);
// o===a is true, o===b is false, o===c is false
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just by the way, what you're all doing is overwriting properties, not merging... this is how javascript objects area really merged: only keys in the to obejct which are not objects themelves will be overwritten by from. everything else will be REALLY MERGED. ofc you can change this behaviour to not overwrite anything which exists like only if to[n] is undefined etc....

var realMerge = function (to, from) {
    for (n in from) {
        if (typeof to[n] != 'object') {
            to[n] = from[n];
        } else if (typeof from[n] == 'object') {
            to[n] = realMerge(to[n], from[n]);
        }
    }

    return to;
};

Usage:

var merged = realMerge(obj1, obj2);
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1  
Helped me a lot, the underscore js extend did actually overwrite, instead of merge –  David Cumps Feb 26 at 8:01
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Here's my stab which

  1. supports deep merge
  2. does not mutate arguments
  3. takes any number of arguments
  4. does not extend the object prototype
  5. does not depend on another library (jQuery, MooTools, Underscore, etc.)
  6. includes check for hasOwnProperty
  7. is short :)

    /*
    Recursively merge properties and return new object
    obj1 <- obj2 [ <- ... ]
    */
    function merge () {
        var dst = {}
            ,src
            ,p
            ,args = [].splice.call(arguments, 0)
        ;

        while (args.length > 0) {
            src = args.splice(0, 1)[0];
            if (toString.call(src) == '[object Object]') {
                for (p in src) {
                    if (src.hasOwnProperty(p)) {
                        if (toString.call(src[p]) == '[object Object]') {
                            dst[p] = merge(dst[p] || {}, src[p]);
                        } else {
                            dst[p] = src[p];
                        }
                    }
                }
            }
        }

        return dst;
    }

example:


    a = {
        "p1": "p1a",
        "p2": [
            "a",
            "b",
            "c"
        ],
        "p3": true,
        "p5": null,
        "p6": {
            "p61": "p61a",
            "p62": "p62a",
            "p63": [
                "aa",
                "bb",
                "cc"
            ],
            "p64": {
                "p641": "p641a"
            }
        }
    };

    b = {
        "p1": "p1b",
        "p2": [
            "d",
            "e",
            "f"
        ],
        "p3": false,
        "p4": true,
        "p6": {
            "p61": "p61b",
            "p64": {
                "p642": "p642b"
            }
        }
    };

    c = {
        "p1": "p1c",
        "p3": null,
        "p6": {
            "p62": "p62c",
            "p64": {
                "p643": "p641c"
            }
        }
    };

    d = merge(a, b, c);
    /*
    d = {
        "p1": "p1c",
        "p2": [
            "d",
            "e",
            "f"
        ],
        "p3": null,
        "p5": null,
        "p6": {
            "p61": "p61b",
            "p62": "p62c",
            "p63": [
                "aa",
                "bb",
                "cc"
            ],
            "p64": {
                "p641": "p641a",
                "p642": "p642b",
                "p643": "p641c"
            }
        },
        "p4": true
    };
    */
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//Takes any number of objects and returns one merged object
var objectMerge = function(){
    var out = {};
    if(!arguments.length)
        return out;
    for(var i=0; i<arguments.length; i++) {
        for(var key in arguments[i]){
            out[key] = arguments[i][key];
        }
    }
    return out;
}

tested with

console.log(objectMerge({a:1, b:2}, {a:2, c:4}));

results in

{ a: 2, b: 2, c: 4 }

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gossi's extension of David Coallier's method:

check these 2 lines:

from = arguments[i];
Object.getOwnPropertyNames(from).forEach(function (name) {

one need to check "from" against null object ... if for example merging an object that comes from an ajax response, previously created on a server, an object property can have a value of "null" and in that case the above code generate an error saying:

"from" is not a valid object

so for example wrapping the "...Object.getOwnPropertyNames(from).forEach..." function with an "if (from != null) { ... }" will prevent that error occuring

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Even though this is an old post, I think it's worth to mention that the version from the 140byt.es collection is solving the task within minmal space and is worth a try for this purpose:

Code:

function m(a,b,c){for(c in b)b.hasOwnProperty(c)&&((typeof a[c])[0]=='o'?m(a[c],b[c]):a[c]=b[c])}

Usage for your purpose:

m(obj1,obj2);      

Here's the original Gist

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With underscore to merge an array of objects:

var arrayOfObjects = [ {a:1}, {b:2, c:3}, {d:4} ];
_(arrayOfObjects).reduce(function(memo, o) { return _(memo).extend(o); });

result in:

Object {a: 1, b: 2, c: 3, d: 4}
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For those using Node.js, there's a built-in library. https://www.npmjs.org/package/node.extend

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There's a library called deepmerge on github: https://github.com/nrf110/deepmerge that seems to be getting some tracktion. It's a standalonie, available through both npm and bower package managers.

I would be inclined to use or improve on this instead of copy-pasting code from answers.

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The correct implementation in Prototype should look like this:

var obj1 = { food: 'pizza', car: 'ford' }
var obj2 = { animal: 'dog' }

obj1 = Object.extend(obj1, obj2);
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I'm kinda getting started with JavaScript so correct me if I'm wrong.

But wouldn't it be better if you could merge any number of objects. Here's how I do it using the native Arguments object.

The key to is that you can actually pass any number of arguments to a JavaScript function without defining them in the function declaration. You just can't access them without using the Arguments object.

function mergeObjects() (

    var tmpObj = {};

    for(var o in arguments) {

       for(var m in arguments[o]) {

           tmpObj[m] = arguments[o][m];

        }

    }

    return tmpObj;

}
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Deep recursive merge of json strings and values
(better implantation to Markus answer)

Code:

function mergeRecursive(obj1, obj2) {
    for (var p in obj2) {
        if( obj2.hasOwnProperty(p)){
            obj1[p] = typeof obj2[p] === 'object' ? mergeRecursive(obj1[p], obj2[p]) : obj2[p];
        }
    }
    return obj1;
}

Example:

o1 = { a:1, b:2, c:{ ca:1, cb:2, cc:{ cca:100, ccb:200 }}}; 
o2 = { a:10, c:{ ca:10, cb:20, cc:{ cca:101, ccb:202 }}};
mergeRecursive(o1, o2);

output:

{ a : 10,
     b : 2,
     c : {
         ca : 10,
         cb : 20,
         cc : { 
             cca : 101,
             ccb : 202 
         } 
     } 
};
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3  
This falls over if o2 contains any properties that don't already exist in o1, which is exactly why Markus has the try/catch you've removed. Your example only works because all of o2's properties already exist in o1. So, this isn't a merge, and it isn't better! –  pancake Apr 24 '12 at 5:02
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In YUI this should get the job done

Y.merge(obj1, obj2, obj3....)

http://yuilibrary.com/yui/docs/yui/yui-merge.html

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function extend()
{ 
    var o = {}; 

    for (var i in arguments)
    { 
        var s = arguments[i]; 

        for (var i in s)
        { 
            o[i] = s[i]; 
        } 
    } 

    return o;
}
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This merges obj into a "default" def. obj has precedence for anything that exists in both, since obj is copied into def. Note also that this is recursive.

function mergeObjs(def, obj) {
    if (typeof obj == 'undefined') {
        return def;
    } else if (typeof def == 'undefined') {
        return obj;
    }
    for (var i in obj) {
        if (obj[i] != null && obj[i].constructor == Object) {
            def[i] = mergeObjs(def[i], obj[i]);
        } else {
            def[i] = obj[i];
        }
    }
    return def;
}

a = {x : {y : [123]}}
b = {x : {z : 123}}
console.log(mergeObjs(a, b));
// {x: {y : [123], z : 123}}
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A={a:1,b:function(){alert(9)}}
B={a:2,c:3}
A.merge = function(){for(var i in B){A[i]=B[i]}}
A.merge()

Result is: {a:2,c:3,b:function()}

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protected by zyklus Jun 11 at 17:50

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