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I thought this would be something simple to do with regular expressions but so far the solution is proving to be elusive. Here is the scenario - I want to capture the subdomain portion of a URL but not "www." if it exists, e.g. assuming either of these URLs

www.mysubdomain.mydomain.com
mysubdomain.mydomain.com

I want the expression to return only mysubdomain - no dots!

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1  
Lots of answer for your question stackoverflow.com/questions/1189128/… or stackoverflow.com/questions/4093806/… –  sk8terboi87 ツ Jun 15 '13 at 15:51
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and if there are subdomains of subdomains? And what about something like subdomain.domain.co.uk? –  Beat Jun 15 '13 at 15:51
    
@Beat I don't care about the second situation - this is for a specific .com domain. As for subdomains of subdomains - correct me if I'm wrong but isn't that what "www" is in the first example? Anyway, "www" is the only use case of subdomain of subdomain I am interested in, and I only want to strip it out. –  fatman45 Jun 15 '13 at 18:38
    
@sk8terboi87ツ Neither of those answer my question. Each is trying to solve a slightly different problem. The first one comes close but includes "www.". –  fatman45 Jun 15 '13 at 18:58

1 Answer 1

If the language you use support lookbehind you can use this:

(?<=^www\.|^)[^.]+

If it don't, use this:

^(?:www\.)?([^.]+)

and your result is in the first capturing group, example in javascript:

var mystring = 'www.mysubdomain.mydomain.com';
var match = /^(?:www\.)?([^.]+)/.exec(myString);
console.log(match[1]);
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Thanks but I tried both of those in two different online Regex testers RegEx Pal and JRX and the first syntax doesn't work at all, the second doesn't do what I want - it also returns the "www.". –  fatman45 Jun 15 '13 at 18:41
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@user2479894: normal for the first pattern, javascript doesn't have the lookbehind feature. The second pattern returns www.subdomain, normal too, but you can extract from your result the first capturing group that contains only subdomain –  Casimir et Hippolyte Jun 15 '13 at 18:46
    
+1 for simple and elegant –  Denomales Jun 15 '13 at 20:47

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