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My task for you this time is to implement an insertion sort algorithm. Sure, everyone and his dog can do it; but how easy is it to do in the fewest characters? One must take an array (or suitable alternative in your language) of 32-bit integers and sort them by value via the insertion sort method, then return the sorted array as a copy (not damaging the original).

Examples:

Input: {20, 45, 3, 62 }
Output: {3, 20, 45, 62 }

Input: {5, 2, 3, 1, 5, 4}
Output: {1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 5}

Misc:

  • No using builtin or existing implementations of any kind of sorting in libraries.
  • Only the code for the actual algorithm counts; it's up to you to output the results.
  • The page i specified covers all the details of insertion sort so look there if you have any questions about the algorithm.
share|improve this question
    
How do we return the result? Do we modify the original list or return a newly sorted list? Are we allowed to do this destructively? –  Chris Lutz Nov 11 '09 at 2:47
    
It must return a copy and not modify the original. –  RCIX Nov 11 '09 at 3:07
1  
Some of the answers here appear to be selection sorts. –  gnibbler Nov 11 '09 at 5:52
    
Hm. Well most of the code is too obfuscated for me to tell, so as people spot them, can they add a comment? –  RCIX Nov 11 '09 at 6:23

20 Answers 20

up vote 6 down vote accepted

Golfscript - 24 chars

~:A,,{).A\<$A@>+:A}%-1=

Runs from the command line

$ echo -n [5 4 3 2 1 6] |../golfscript.rb insertsort.gs 
123456

Verify that it is insertion sort by printing at each iteration

~:A,,{).A\<$A@>+:A.p}%-1=

The first iteration the 4 is inserted before the 5, selection sort for example would move the 1 to the start for the first iteration

$ echo -n [5 4 3 2 1 6] |../golfscript.rb insertsort.gs 
[5 4 3 2 1 6]
[4 5 3 2 1 6]
[3 4 5 2 1 6]
[2 3 4 5 1 6]
[1 2 3 4 5 6]
[1 2 3 4 5 6]
123456

And for the examples given, i also added a p to the end here to stop the numbers getting squashed together. Golfscript's default way of printing arrays is to just print the contents without any spaces.

$ echo -n [20 45 3 62] |../golfscript.rb insertsort.gs 
[20 45 3 62]
[20 45 3 62]
[3 20 45 62]
[3 20 45 62]
[3 20 45 62]

$ echo -n [5 2 3 1 5 4] |../golfscript.rb insertsort.gs 
[5 2 3 1 5 4]
[2 5 3 1 5 4]
[2 3 5 1 5 4]
[1 2 3 5 5 4]
[1 2 3 5 5 4]
[1 2 3 4 5 5]
[1 2 3 4 5 5]

How it works
~ converts the command line args into an array of int
:A creates a variable A which is the list to be sorted
, gets the length of A
, create a list [0 1 .. len(A)]
{}% executes a map over the list we just created. The output of the map is a list of all the partially sorted states.
-1= pulls the last item off the result of the map (which is the sorted list)
fin. so golfscript prints whatever is left on the stack, which is just our sorted list

inside the map
) increments the number
.A\< takes sorted lhs part of the list + the next element
$ inserts the new element into the correct place (This is the step that Aaron says is a little cheaty)
A@> get the unsorted part
+ join the sorted and unsorted parts together
:A store the result back in A for the next iteration

share|improve this answer
    
I'm blown away. I'm accepting this answer! Though it would be nice if you showed the examples i provided! –  RCIX Nov 11 '09 at 6:43
    
@RCIX I added the examples –  gnibbler Nov 11 '09 at 6:58
3  
Screw the examples. It'd be nice if you explained how the code worked :-) Actually, it's interesting. Now that there's a language tailored for code golf, even Perl probably doesn't stand a chance - all future winners are likely to be in GolfScript. Is it even worth competing anymore? –  paxdiablo Nov 11 '09 at 8:03
3  
A little cheaty since you're using a built-in sort ('$') when that's explicitly not allowed... –  Aaron Nov 12 '09 at 20:15
1  
All right i need to clarify; i meant no using any kind of sort implementation already built. Sorry! –  RCIX Nov 13 '09 at 1:57

Haskell, 45 characters:

i=foldl(\x i->let(a,b)=span(<i)x in a++i:b)[]

Or, more analogous to barkmadley's entry (same 45 characters):

i=foldl s[];s x i=a++i:b where(a,b)=span(<i)x

Key is using span instead of rolling your own...

(also, could you arguably drop the "i=", to cut it to 43 characters?)

share|improve this answer
    
Oh wow -- somehow I never noticed before that the fixity of ++ versus : lets you get away with that! –  ephemient Nov 13 '09 at 5:21

J

38 characters.

(([<.{.@]),}.@]$:~[>.{.@])`[@.(0=#@])/

Explanation:

   NB. given two arguments, return the left argument
   insert0 =: 4 : 'x'
   insert0 =: [
   NB. given two arguments, return the lesser of left and head of right
   insert1min =: 4 : 'x <. {. y'
   insert1min =: [ <. {.@]
   NB. given two arguments, return the greater of left and head of right
   insert1max =: [ >. {.@]
   NB. recurse with insert1max and tail of right, and prepend insert1min
   insert1 =: 4 : 'x insert1min y , (x insert1max y) insert }. y'
   insert1 =: insert1min , insert1max insert }.@]
   insert1 =: insert1min , }.@] insert~ insert1max
   NB. if right has zero length, insert0, else insert1
   NB. the recursive reference to insert in insert1 can be replaced by $:
   insert =: insert1 ` insert0 @. (0 = #@])
   NB. apply insert between all elements of argument
   sort =: insert/

Imagining the step-by-step evaluation,

   sort 5 2 3 1 5 4
=> 5 insert 2 insert 3 insert 1 insert 5 insert 4
=> 5 insert 2 insert 3 insert 1 insert 4 5
=> 5 insert 2 insert 3 insert 1 4 5
=> 5 insert 2 insert 1 3 4 5
=> 5 insert 1 2 3 4 5
=> 5 insert1 1 2 3 4 5
=> (5 insert1min 1 2 3 4 5) , (5 insert1max 1 2 3 4 5) insert (}. 1 2 3 4 5)
=> 1 , 5 insert 2 3 4 5
=> 1 , 2 , 5 insert 3 4 5
=> 1 , 2 , 3 , 5 insert 4 5
=> 1 , 2 , 3 , 4 , 5 insert 5
=> 1 , 2 , 3 , 4 , 5 , 5 insert >a:
=> 1 , 2 , 3 , 4 , 5 , 5 insert0 >a:
=> 1 , 2 , 3 , 4 , 5 , 5
1 2 3 4 5 5
share|improve this answer
    
Unbelievable! This will probably be accepted but i'll give other people some time to work on theirs –  RCIX Nov 11 '09 at 5:46
    
very nice... I see emos everywhere [>.@] –  yan bellavance Nov 11 '09 at 6:01

haskell 58 characters excluding the main function i used to test, including newlines.

i=foldl s []
s (x:y) i=min x i:s y (max x i)
s _ i=[i]

main = print $ map i [[20, 45, 3, 62], [5, 2, 3, 1, 5, 4]]

haskell is non-descructive as well and returns a new list.

49 characters

i=foldl s[];s[]i=[i];s(x:y)i=min x i:s y(max x i)

as per ephemients comment. the difference is in the base case and removing a bunch of unnecessary white space.

share|improve this answer
2  
Shortened to 49: i=foldl s[];s[]i=[i];s(x:y)i=min x i:s y(max x i) –  ephemient Nov 11 '09 at 5:13
    
nice one ephemient –  barkmadley Nov 11 '09 at 5:23

Python, 71 characters.

My original version is below but @RCIX changed the rules (oops, I mean clarified the specifications) to insist the original list was preserved, so here at 71 characters:

def f(o):
 t=o[:];n=[]
 while t:v=min(t);n+=[v];t.remove(v)
 return n

s=[20, 45, 3, 62];print s;print f(s);print s;print "==="
s=[5, 2, 3, 1, 5, 4];print s; print f(s);print s;print "==="

which gives:

[20, 45, 3, 62]
[3, 20, 45, 62]
[20, 45, 3, 62]
===
[5, 2, 3, 1, 5, 4]
[1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 5]
[5, 2, 3, 1, 5, 4]
===

You can see that the original list is preserved.

Here's the original version if you don't care about preserving the original list - I'm leaving it here just for historical purposes (64 characters):

def f(o):
 n=[]
 while o:v=min(o);n+=[v];o.remove(v)
 return n

s=[20, 45, 3, 62];print s;print f(s);print s;print "==="
s=[5, 2, 3, 1, 5, 4];print s; print f(s);print s;print "==="

This produces:

[20, 45, 3, 62]
[3, 20, 45, 62]
[]
===
[5, 2, 3, 1, 5, 4]
[1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 5]
[]
===
share|improve this answer
    
This is python, right? –  Kugel Nov 13 '09 at 0:12
    
Yes, @Kugel, clarified that. –  paxdiablo Nov 13 '09 at 1:17

C89, 109 chars

C isn't known for its low golf scores, but here's an earnest effort. It requires the caller to pass in the destination array, which must be large enough. The order of parameters is the same as the various mem/str standard library functions, namely dest, source, size.

// Unobfuscated
sort(b, a, s)
    int *b, *a;
{
    int *c, t;
    memcpy(b, a, 4*s);
    for(c = b; c < b+s; )
        for(a = c++; a > b; )
            t = *--a,
            a[1] < t ? (*a = a[1], a[1] = t)
                   : 0;
}

// Compressed
sort(b,a,s)int*a,*b;{int*c,t;memcpy(b,a,4*s);for(c=b;c<b+s;)for(a=c++;a>b;)t=*--a,a[1]<t?(*a=a[1],a[1]=t):0;}

Example usage:

int a[5] = {3, 1, 5, 2, 4}, b[5];
sort(b, a, 5);
// b is now {1, 2, 3, 4, 5}, a is unchanged
share|improve this answer

Perl 72 chars, as long as recursion isn't cheating.

sub i{my$m;$_[$_]<$_[$m]&&($m=$_)for 1..$#_;(splice(@_,$m,1),@_?i@_:@_)}

I'm incredulous that I couldn't find an argmin function (return index of the minimal element of a list) in a module anywhere. That could have been helpful. Also way too many $s.


With a min function it takes 62 chars (not counting the 19 characters needed to import the min function)

use List'Util"min";sub i{my$i;(splice(@_,{map{$_,$i++}@_}->{min@_},1),@_?i@_:@_)}
share|improve this answer
    
Not that it helps, but search.cpan.org/perldoc?List::Util#min –  ephemient Nov 11 '09 at 5:25
    
Try 38 char J solution: stackoverflow.com/questions/1712606/… –  RCIX Nov 11 '09 at 5:47

Python 70-ish. This is pretty much your C# answer in python

def F(s):
 r=[]
 while s:
  m=min(s)
  r+=[k]
  s.remove(m)
 return r


Python 59 chars. still destructive.

F=lambda s:sum([[s.pop(s.index(min(s)))] for j in s[:]],[])

share|improve this answer
1  
As loath as you may be to muddy your precious syntax with it, you can shorten by 4 chars if you replace all the newline/whitespace lines in the loop with semicolons. –  Chris Lutz Nov 11 '09 at 2:44
    
Also, this destroys the original list, which may or may not be against the rules. –  Chris Lutz Nov 11 '09 at 2:47
1  
r+=[k] ?? Should that be m instead of k? –  paxdiablo Nov 11 '09 at 3:15
    
67, and not destroying original list: F=lambda s:[[r.pop(r.index(min(r))) for i in s] for r in [s[:]]][0] –  Paul Nov 15 '09 at 13:04

Ruby 68 - I definitely improved on my first attempt

def s a;b=[];until(c=a.shift).nil?;c<=(a.min||c)?b<<c:a<<c;end;b;end

Original: Ruby ~114 - There are probably better ways of doing this in ruby. shrug

def s(a=[])
a.size.times {|i|
v=a[i];j=i-1
while j>=0 && a[j]>=v
a[j+1]=a[j]
j-=1
end
a[j+1]=v
}
a
end
share|improve this answer
    
This is not an insertion sort. It's a selection sort that reorders (and eventually removes all items from) the original array. Each element is removed from the input array one at a time and compared to the minimum value from the remaining input. If the removed item is as small as the min, it pushes it on the end of the output, otherwise it pushes on the end of the input and tries again.) –  DigitalRoss Nov 12 '09 at 3:08

Java - 154 chars, not including spaces :)

static void s(int[] i) {
    int a, b, k, t = 0;
    int n = 1;
    while (n <= i.length - 1) {
        a = n;
        b = n-1;
        do {
            if (i[a] < i[b]) {
                k = i[b];
                i[b] = i[a];
                i[a] = k;
                t = 1;
            }
            --a;
            --b;
        } while (t == 1 && a >= 1);
        t = 0;
        ++n;
    }
}
share|improve this answer

Perl in 80 chars (sorry, it's the best I can do when the language doesn't have a built-in min() function):

sub f{while(@_){$x=0;$_[$x]>$_[$_] and$x=$_ for 0..$#_;push@r,splice@_,$x,1;}@r}
share|improve this answer

PLT Scheme in 131 chars. (Shaved of some chars using nested ifs instead of cond).

(define(f v)(define(i h v t)(if(null? t)`(,@h,v)(if(< v(car t))`(,@h,v,@t)(i`(,@h,(car t))v(cdr t)))))(foldl(λ(v l)(i'()v l))'()v))

PLT Scheme in 137 chars.

(define(f v)(define(i h v t)(cond((null? t)`(,@h,v))((< v(car t))`(,@h,v,@t))(#t(i`(,@h,(car t))v(cdr t)))))(foldl(λ(v l)(i'()v l))'()v)

Pretty:

(define (f v)
  (define (i h v t)
    (cond ((null? t) `(,@h ,v))
          ((< v (car t)) `(,@h ,v ,@t))
          (#t (i `(,@h ,(car t)) v (cdr t)))))
  (foldl (λ (v l) (i '() v l)) '() v))
share|improve this answer

MATLAB in 101 chars.

function L=g(L),for m=2:length(L),for k=m:-1:2,if L(k)<L(k-1),p=L(k);L(k)=L(k-1);L(k-1)=p;end;end;end

As gnibbler pointed out, my first attempt was selection sort, and much shorter. Oh well.

Previous: WRONG MATLAB in 62 chars. Yay for implied pass by reference:

function M=g(L),M=[];for c=L,[v,k]=min(L);L(k)=Inf;M=[M v];end
share|improve this answer

F#, 69 chars based on comingstorm's solution:

let g L=Seq.fold(fun s x->let a,b=List.partition((>)x)s in a@x::b)[]L

It's almost an exact translation, and it's hard for me to imagine this one getting any shorter soon. I tried making the parameter L implicit by currying, but F#'s type inference system says no.

If you want to see the intermediate stages (the sorted accumulator s in the code), replace Seq.fold by Seq.scan. For example:

let h L=Seq.scan(fun s x->let a,b=List.partition((>)x)s in a@x::b)[]L

[5;2;3;1;5;4] |> h |> Seq.iter (printfn "%A")

Output:

[]
[5]
[2; 5]
[2; 3; 5]
[1; 2; 3; 5]
[1; 2; 3; 5; 5]
[1; 2; 3; 4; 5; 5]

Edit: Here's barkmadley's Haskell transmuted into F#. I had to use foldBack instead of fold, since that allows me to use function|..->.. instead of Match param with |..->.. to save a few chars:

let rec s i=function|h::t->min h i::(s(max h i)t)|_->[i]
let f L=List.foldBack s L []

85 chars, including the newline.

share|improve this answer

Lua, 111 characters

function f(a)b={}for i=1,#a do p=#b v=a[i]while p>0 and
v<b[p]do b[p+1]=b[p]p=p-1 end b[p+1]=v end return b end
--test code

a={20, 45, 3, 62}
print(table.concat(f(a), "\t"))

a={5, 2, 3, 1, 5, 4}
print(table.concat(f(a), "\t"))

a={...}
print(table.concat(f(a), "\t"))
share|improve this answer

Javascript - 90 characters Nothing particularly clever here, though it does take advantage of semicolon insertion and uses global variables. The version which passes JSLint is about 103 characters.

function s(a){
  b=[];
  for(i in a){
    x=0;
    while(b[x]&&b[x]<a[i]){
      x++
    }
    b.splice(x,0,a[i])
  }
  return b
}
share|improve this answer

F#: 105 chars

let s l=l|>Seq.fold(fun a v->let rec l=function[]->[v]|x::xs->if v<x then v::x::xs else x::l xs in l a)[]

Expanded:

let sort input=
    input
    |> Seq.fold(fun acc value ->
        let rec insert = function
            | [] -> [value]
            | x::xs -> if value < x then value::x::xs else x::insert xs
        in insert acc
        ) []

Explanation:

For each value in the input list, the internal function insert pushes value into an accumulator list in the first spot place where value is greater than its neighbor. Since it builds up a new list, this function is non-destructive.

share|improve this answer

Clojure - 150 chars

Someone can probably make it shorter.

(def ! #(if(seq%)(let[f(first%)](if(>=(nth%2%3 f)f)(recur(next%)(apply
conj(into[](take%3%2))f(nthnext%2%3))0)(recur%%2(inc%3))))%2))(def ? #(!%[]0))

And pretty:

(defn sort-it
  ([coll] (sort-it coll [] 0))  
  ([in out ndx]
    (if (seq in)
      (if (>= (nth out ndx (first in))
              (first in))
        (do 
          (println out)
          (recur (next in)
                 (apply conj 
                        (into [] (take ndx out))
                        (first in)
                        (nthnext out ndx))
                 0))
       (recur in out (inc ndx)))
      out)))

Fun time, as always.

share|improve this answer
    
I wrote up a version that only maintains a single collection, instead of an in and out, but that was longer at 213 chars compressed. I'll share if anyone's interested, but otherwise I see no reason to. –  nilamo Nov 13 '09 at 1:05

C#: 140 chars. Pre-golfed before asking, but i only spent 15 minutes or so on it.

Up to 163 after modifying it to make sure the list is not damaged and a sorted copy is returned.

Down to 162 after correcting an error and adding a using.

Down to 153 thanks to mtrw.

using n=List<Int>;static n InsertionSort(n s){n l=s;int i,j,t;for(i=2;i<l.Count;i++){for(j=i;j>1&&l[j]<l[--j];){t=l[j];l[j]=l[j+1];l[j+1]=t;}}return l;}
share|improve this answer
    
I'm no C# programmer, but why is it static void InsertionSort() if it returns a value? Shouldn't it be static List<int> InsertionSort()? –  Chris Lutz Nov 11 '09 at 3:14
    
Good point, i missed that when fixing it! –  RCIX Nov 11 '09 at 3:22
    
Can you replace RemoveAt/InsertAt with l[j]=l[j+1];l[j+1]=t;? –  mtrw Nov 11 '09 at 4:16
    
Hmm. Yup that works, thanks! –  RCIX Nov 11 '09 at 5:43
    
Never thought of using using for shortening generics... –  Dykam Nov 13 '09 at 0:06

C++, 102 characters

void f(int*i,int*o,int s){int j,k;for(j=0;j<s;j++){for(k=j;k&&i[j]<o[k-1];k--)o[k]=o[k-1];o[k]=i[j];}}
share|improve this answer

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