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My question is thus:

Suppose you have String myString = "SOME_CHARACTERS_THAT_NEED_MODIFICATION"; that you would want to have look like String modifiedString = "Some Characters That Need Modification". The "pure String" way to do it (and the case-independent way) would (optimize this as necessary):

//obtaining the locations of all the occurrences of '_'
int activeIndex = 0;
ArrayList <Integer> indexList = new ArrayList<Integer>();
while (activeIndex != -1)
{
    activeIndex = myString.indexOf('_', activeIndex + 1);
    indexList.add(new Integer(activeIndex));
}
//replacing all '_' with ' '
String tempString = myString.replace('_', ' ');
//declaring empty modifiedString
String modifiedString;
//lowercasing all characters that are not first characters of a word (here, a word is defined as being terminated by '_' or newline
for (int x = 0; x < indexList.size(); x++)
{
    modifiedString += tempString.substring(indexList.get(x), indexList.get(x)+1);
    if (x != indexList.size() - 1)
        //appending first uppercase character of word plus lowercased characters of the rest of the word
        modifiedString += tempString.subString(indexList.get(x)+1,indexList.get(x+1)).toLowerCase();
    else
        //we are near the end of the String (as far as ' ' is concerned)
        modifiedString += tempString.substring(index.get(x), tempString.length().toLowerCase());
}
//moving this modified String to modifiedString
modifiedString = tempString;

The other way I was proposing to do this would have been to dump myString into an array of characters, and then do array-based manipulation of all the characters. This would be easy in C++; a String is both an array of characters and an Object there! My question is, however, would both algorithms have the same complexity? //As a character array, I could probably do some arithmetic, assuming that the alphanumeric characters are numerically in the ASCII range (0 through 127). In fact, (int)uppercaseChar == (int)lowercaseChar - 32; for any of the uppercaseChar ranging from A-Z and any corresponding lowercaseChar ranging from a-z.

The char[] way to do would probably be something like (may need optimization)

//declaring necessary variables and containers
int activeIndex = 0;
ArrayList<Integer> indexList = new ArrayList<Integer>();

while (activeIndex != -1)
{
    //finding all '_'
    activeIndex = myString.indexOf('_', activeIndex + 1);
    //pushing it to indexArray
    indexArray.add(new Integer(activeIndex));
}
//dumping String to char[]
char[] charArray = myString.toCharArray();
for (int x = 0; x < indexArray.size(); x++)
{
    //making every '_' a ' '
    charArray[indexArray.get(x)] = ' ';
    //lowercasing every capitalized character that isn't a first character in a word
}
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The same rules apply for Unicode; Unicode extends ASCII implements Everything –  Mike Warren Jun 15 '13 at 18:14
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3 Answers

up vote 1 down vote accepted

I think, doing it through ASCII or unicode way would be better.

Iterate through the array, Except for the first character, keep replacing all characters to lower case(through arithmetic calculation that you talked about) until you find a character whose ascii value is same as '_'. Once you get this character, again except for the first character, replace everything else with lower case, until again you get '_'. This can be done in just one iteration.

Whereas string.replace all would itself take one iteration just to replace.And your code would still look lot cleaner.

Note :Assuming the input pattern to be exactly the same.

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would both algorithms have the same complexity?

No. If the input string holds n consecutive underscores, then

for (int x = 0; x < indexList.size(); x++)
    modifiedString += tempString.substring(indexList.get(x), indexList.get(x)+1);

will append a single underscore n times. Since the old value of modifiedString has to be copied every time around the loop at linear time cost, the whole algorithm takes quadratic time.

By contrast, the "char[] approach" takes linear time.

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Unless "optimize this as necessary" includes using a StringBuilder or char array to store the modifiedString. The length is known in advance, so we can make sure each character is only copied once. –  Jer Jun 15 '13 at 18:31
    
@Jer: "optimize this as necessary" is an invitation to cheat and change the entire algorithm :) –  larsmans Jun 15 '13 at 18:39
    
Yes, that thought crossed my mind :) –  Jer Jun 15 '13 at 18:58
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Extending @zerocool 's answer, I found out the code to the way to do this optimally. It is something like:

private char[] charArray = myString.toCharArray();
int indexOfUnderscore = -1;
for (int x = 0; x < charArray.length; x++)
{
    if (charArray[x] == '_')
    {
        charArray[x] = ' ';
        indexOfUnderscore = x;
    }
    else
    {
        if (x > indexOfUnderscore + 1)
        {
            charArray[x] = (char)((int)charArray[x] + 32);
        }
    }
}

The algorithmic complexity of the above code would be, ignoring String.toCharArray(), O(length). We could then just say something like private String modifiedString = new String(charArray); to get it back as a String. I feel the character-array way is syntactically simpler to understand than the built-in String functions.

@zerocool, I wish I would have seen your answer when I thought up this.

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