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When looking through code of a relatively big existing codebase, I found the following function:

int write_actual_size(unsigned int actual_size, int &out_size)
{
  unsigned char second;
  unsigned char third;
  unsigned char fourth;
  int result;
  int usedBytes;

  *(unsigned char *)out_size = actual_size | 0x80;
  if ( actual_size < 0x80 ) {
    *(unsigned char *)out_size = ((unsigned char)actual_size | 0x80) & 0x7F;
    result = 1;
  } else {
    second = (actual_size >> 7) | 0x80;
    *(unsigned char *)(out_size + 1) = second;
    if (actual_size < 0x4000) {
      *(unsigned char *)(out_size + 1) = second & 0x7F;
      usedBytes = 2;
    } else {
      third = (actual_size >> 14) | 0x80;
      *(unsigned char *)(out_size + 2) = third;
      if (actual_size < 0x200000) {
        *(unsigned char *)(out_size + 2) = third & 0x7F;
        usedBytes = 3;
      }
      else {
        fourth = (actual_size >> 21) | 0x80;
        *(unsigned char *)(out_size + 3) = fourth;
        if (actual_size < 0x10000000) {
          *(unsigned char *)(out_size + 3) = fourth & 0x7F;
          usedBytes = 4;
        }
      }
    }
    result = usedBytes;
  }
  return result;
}

This encodes a normal unsigned integer into one or more bytes, depending on the original input size.

As I understand, the left most bit is used to determine if there is a "follow-up" byte. I assume the reason for this is to save on bandwidth (even if it is just max 3 bytes per packet). Are these valid assumptions?

I want to make a read_actual_size version... Can I just linearly "shift right 7" every byte until I encounter a "0"?

Please don't be very harsh, I'm quite new to C.

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This looks like C++ not C (the int &out_size in the function arguments). Either way, the pointer casting that's occurring is pretty wacky; whatever it's doing, I'm not sure it's correct... –  Oli Charlesworth Jun 15 '13 at 19:53
    
Not to mention that - seemingly - it assumes an 8-bit char. –  user529758 Jun 15 '13 at 19:55
    
@OliCharlesworth: I didn't write that code but I assume out_size could just be an unsigned char * instead. And then remove all the casts... But do you know if my assumptions are correct? –  user2489511 Jun 15 '13 at 20:04
1  
@H2CO3: Thanks for your answer :) I might change it to uint8_t, but could you give me answers to my specific questions? Thanks so much. –  user2489511 Jun 15 '13 at 20:04

1 Answer 1

up vote 2 down vote accepted

A generic VLQ decoder would look something like this:

int decode_vlq(unsigned char *input)
{
    int result = 0;
    do
    {
        result = (result << 7) | (*input & 0x7F);
    }
    while (*input++ & 0x80);
    return result;
}

I'm open to suggestions, since my C is pretty rusty, and I wrote this by hand.

share|improve this answer
    
VLQ! Thank you so much, with this information I'll be able to figure it out thanks!!! –  user2489511 Jun 15 '13 at 20:14
    
Minor detail: you can use compound assignment operators for the sake of readability :) result <<= 7; result |= *input & 0x7f; –  user529758 Jun 15 '13 at 20:21
    
@KendallFrey mmmm I'm not sure if this is correct, I think the order of significance is off... –  user2489511 Jun 15 '13 at 20:57
    
I reversed the order, by doing a result |= *input << (7 * offset) instead. –  user2489511 Jun 15 '13 at 21:30

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