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I am trying to use a while loop to call functions from a class in another file, and then change the function to be called next based on what the original function returned. You may recognize some of this from "Learning Python the Hard Way."

I have two files: engine.py and rooms.py. Engine.py contains the while loop that calls functions from a class in rooms.py called 'Rooms'.

An example from rooms.py:

class Rooms(object):    
    def __init__(self): #add start as arg for one class game
        from random import randint
        from sys import exit

    def princess_lives_here(self):
        print "Cake"

        eat_it = raw_input("1\n2\n3\?> ")

        if eat_it == "1":
            return 'death'

        elif eat_it == "2":
            return 'death'

        elif eat_it == "3":
            return 'gold_koi_pond'

        else:
            return 'death'

This is a simple mockup of the actual game to make sure I can get the mechanism to work correctly. 'death' and 'gold_koi_pond' are all functions contained within the class Rooms.

I have three samples of the engine that I want to compare. I'll call them 1, 2 and 3 respectively.

#1 works:

class Engine(object):
    def __init__(self, start):
        self.start = start

    def play(self):
        next = self.start

        while True:
            g = Rooms()
            room = getattr(Rooms, next)
            next = room(g)


from rooms import Rooms

a = Engine("princess_lives_here")
a.play()

#2 works:

class Engine(object):
    def __init__(self, start):
         self.start = start

    def play(self):
         next = self.start

        while True:
             next = getattr(Rooms, next)(Rooms())


from rooms import Rooms

a = Engine("princess_lives_here")
a.play()

#3 does not work:

class Engine(object):
    def __init__(self, start):
        self.start = start

    def play(self):
        next = self.start

        while True:
            room = getattr(Rooms, next)
            next = room()


from rooms import Rooms

a = Engine("princess_lives_here")
a.play()

I'm having a hard time understanding the difference between the three options. Is one better than the other? What exactly is happening in python that makes 1 and 2 work, but not 3? Is there a better way to accomplish what I want to do?

Also, randint and exit don't import when Rooms is run from engine.py. Why is this?

Thanks for any help! I'm open to all advice and critiques, not just about the questions I'm interested in.

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1 Answer 1

1 and 3 are closest, and the difference is that in 1 you create an instance of the Rooms class, in 3 you don't; you are trying to use the unbound methods of the class without passing in an instance:

while True:
    g = Rooms()
    room = getattr(Rooms, next)
    next = room(g)

vs.

while True:
    room = getattr(Rooms, next)
    next = room()

Version 2 just inlines calls; g is substituted for Rooms() and room is substituted for getattr(Rooms, next).

You really should be calling the bound methods instead:

g = Rooms()
while True:
    room = getattr(g, next)
    next = room()

What your two working versions are doing is calling the Rooms methods directly, without an instance; the first argument to a method is always self, but that can only be supplied automatically when you have an actual instance of the class and access the methods via that instance. Under the hood, functions on a class behave as descriptor objects, meaning that on trying to access them on a class or instance they return a method object instead that will call the function on your behalve. Your first two versions have to supply a Rooms() instance manually instead, which your 3rd version is omitting.

My version obtains bound methods instead, by accessing the methods on a single Rooms() instance instead.

You can see the difference when you play with classes in a interactive session:

>>> class Foo(object):
...     def bar(self): print 'baz'
... 
>>> Foo
<class '__main__.Foo'>
>>> Foo.bar
<unbound method Foo.bar>
>>> Foo()
<__main__.Foo object at 0x10fa53d10>
>>> Foo().bar
<bound method Foo.bar of <__main__.Foo object at 0x10fa53dd0>>
>>> Foo.__dict__['bar']
<function bar at 0x10fa46398>
>>> Foo.__dict__['bar'].__get__(None, Foo)
<unbound method Foo.bar>
>>> Foo.__dict__['bar'].__get__(Foo(), Foo)
<bound method Foo.bar of <__main__.Foo object at 0x10fa53dd0>>
>>> Foo.bar(Foo())
baz
>>> Foo().bar()
baz
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