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I have a problem with a git repository. I will describe what I did.

  • I have created a repository in side an existing folder with files using the command git init
  • I added a remote with git add origin git @ ...
  • Instead of commit I used the command git pull origin master what override my files, files with an empty repository

Is there any way to restore my files?

share|improve this question
    
A git pull shouldn't mess with uncommitted local changes. Are you sure they are gone? When I try what you said you did, I get an "error: Untracked working tree file <foo> would be overwritten by merge" – Joe Jun 15 '13 at 20:52
    
Yes, they are gone... I dont know why... Here is my terminal history:git init git st git add -A git remote add origin git@github.co... git pull origin master – Piotr Marek Jun 15 '13 at 21:07
    
@Joe I can reproduce this, there's no warning when I'm doing a pull within a fresh repository without any commits (just files in the index). – Stefan Jun 15 '13 at 22:27
    
@Stefan what version of git? Because I got the results I posted after trying it, before commenting. Hmm. – Joe Jun 15 '13 at 22:57
    
@Joe 1.8.3.1: mkdir foo && cd foo && git init . && touch bar && git add bar && git remote add origin git://github.com/github/gollum.git && git pull origin master doesn't show an error on my system and silently removes bar from the repo. I do see the error when there's at least one commit, but not for a repo without commits. – Stefan Jun 16 '13 at 6:07
up vote 0 down vote accepted

a git pull is a fetch and a merge so is reversable for security checkout a new branch:

git checkout -b restore

then go back with

git reset --hard HEAD^
share|improve this answer
    
It does not work. Restores the state of after the pull. – Piotr Marek Jun 15 '13 at 21:52
1  
you're right, since you don't have commited. If your files were so important check git-scm.com/book/en/Git-Internals-Git-Objects – JuanitoMint Jun 16 '13 at 14:02
    
Thanks! From a cat-file command was able to recover all the files. – Piotr Marek Jun 16 '13 at 15:38

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