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I run this script as

script.sh 'abcdefghijk123456789!@#$%^&' 'aaaa4444ged###'

it should be able to produce an array containing something like

1 1 1 1 15 15 15 15 7 5 23 23 23

with 12 indexes 0 - 11, but what i get is

1 1 1 1 1 5 1 5 1 5 1 5 7 5 2 3 2 3 2 3

with 20 indexes. I want to populate a array with base numbers for a given char. So i have a list of chars that we will be using in $startstring ie. abcc5678% we can say that every char in $startstring is = to one char in the $charset ie. abcd5678!%. This code finds what each $startstring char is equal to $charset's index number. That information is what i am trying to capture in a array. Mostly it works except a bug where instead of the whole number 10 getting stored in decoded[1] what happens is the number 10 is split in to 1 and 0 and then both are put in under separate indexes. So instead of a "1 10 1" and 3 indexes i end up with 4 indexes with "1 1 0 1". Im sure im just handling my variables the wrong way but i searched and searched and now my brain is gonna explode so i came here for some relief. or hope of it anyway. Can someone tell me the proper way to insert digits in to this decoded[] array?

#!/bin/bash
#declare -i decoded
charset=$1              
startstring=$2              


start=$((${#charset}-1))
echo "Setting up CharMap to CharSet"

for i in $(eval echo {0..$start})   
do                  
    echo $i " = " ${charset:$i:1}     
done            

echo "Proving Chars Were Mapped Correctly."

start2=$((${#startstring}))     
start3=$((${#charset}-1))         

for i in $(eval echo {0..$start2})  
do                          

    for p in $(eval echo {0..$start3})          
    do                          

        if [ "${startstring:$i:1}" == "${charset:$p:1}" ]   
            then                            
            echo "found that" ${startstring:$i:1}"=" $p 'from the charmap.'     
            decoded+=$p      #<--### I DONT THINK THIS IS WHAT I NEED ###       
            fi                          
    done                             
done                            
##################Just trying to print my new array#########################
start4=$((${#decoded}-1))               
echo 'Testing the array $decoded'
echo 'the var start4(length of $decoded) = '$start4 
echo 'this number should equal ----------> '$start2            
echo 'Printing out the $decoded array in a for loop'

for c in $(eval echo {0..$start4})          
do                          
   echo  ${decoded[$c]} ###DOESNT WORK LIKE I THOUGHT# also tried echo ${decode:$c:1}                     
done                            
share|improve this question
1  
You should indent your code properly –  sputnick Jun 15 '13 at 21:49
    
I, for one, have no idea what this script is trying to do. and given that it references undeclared variables of unknown type/content - I can't even check. –  user80168 Jun 15 '13 at 21:56
    
I added complete code and show how I run it, What the expected results are and what the results I would get are. –  Chad Merriman Jun 15 '13 at 22:09
    
Thanks alot Steven. –  Chad Merriman Jun 15 '13 at 22:50
1  
Use for ((i=0; i<=start; i++)) in place of for i in $(eval echo {0..$start}) –  chepner Jun 16 '13 at 15:36

1 Answer 1

up vote 1 down vote accepted

decoded+=$p appends $p as a string, not as an array entry. Essentially, you're creating the string "11111515151575232323" by appending all the index numbers together. (Actually, I get "00001414141464322222227" from your example, because of index bound problems. I'll let you worry about that...)

To store the decoded values as an array, set decoded to an empty array before the loop, and then use decoded+=("$p") to add $p as an element:

decoded=()  # create an empty array
for i in $(eval echo {0..$start2})  
do                          
  for p in $(eval echo {0..$start3})            
  do    
    if [ "${startstring:$i:1}" == "${charset:$p:1}" ]   
    then                            
      echo ${startstring:$i:1} "=" $p           
      decoded+=("$p")  # append $p as a new array element
    fi                          
  done                           
done

Then, to get the size of the array (rather than a string length), use ${#decoded[@]}:

start4=$((${#decoded[@]}-1))
share|improve this answer
    
Awesome! And thank you for such a wonderful explanation. Gordon you made my brain better!! –  Chad Merriman Jun 16 '13 at 0:42

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