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I'm not a complete beginner with Linux but I'm using Debian to familiarise myself with it for work.

I have a few quick questions:

  • To run a binary from a terminal, does it have to be in /bin/? What if it has dependencies, must they also go in /bin/?
  • I'm used to installing things on Windows by clicking 'next' a lot. If I download a .tgz and it contains an .exe along with several folders, exactly how is it installed?
  • Is uninstalling in Linux as simple as removing the files, or are there registry style devices that must be modified?

I know these will have been asked before but I cannot get good, clear answers written from a noob friendly point of view. Thanks!

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3 Answers 3

To run a binary from a terminal, does it have to be in /bin/? What if it has dependencies, must they also go in /bin/?

  • To run a binary just run it from the terminal and see if it works. If it has dependencies they will usually be found automatically or check the readme.

I'm used to installing things on Windows by clicking 'next' a lot. If I download a .tgz and it contains an .exe along with several folders, exactly how is it installed?

Is uninstalling in Linux as simple as removing the files, or are there registry style devices that must be modified?

  • Depends which Linux OS you are using. Ubuntu is very simple and has a simple interface just like Windows for uninstalling apps.
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Thanks for the advice. I have another question: I have just unzipped a program into /opt/ and there is no README. I want to run this program from terminal regardless of what the current directory is. I could add the location of the binary as $PATH; is this bad practice? If I install many programs, the PATH variable will get bigger and bigger. Or should I move the binary into /bin/? –  user2450099 Jun 16 '13 at 0:42
    
Binaries are usually located inside /bin. I may not understand your question completely, however, I recommend doing whatever makes the task easiest for you. –  SeaRoth Jun 18 '13 at 20:47

Not every binary will be in /bin or /usr/bin. To run them from the command line you would set the PATH env var to the directory where executables live. For example, if you create a dir /home/users/foo/bin then set the PATH like so:

export PATH=${PATH}:/home/users/foo/bin

After that, you just type the name of the executable into the shell and the full path is found by searching the directories listed in the PATH.

A .tgz should not contain a .exe since that is a Windows specific executable. Typically, executable on Linux do not have an extension.

No, there is no registry under Linux. That specific insanity is only found under Windows.

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1) An executable can be anywhere in directories specified in PATH variable, and you also can run an executable from any location by specifying path to it (if it's in current directory, then write ./<exename>).

2-3) Debian has its own package management system, usually software is installed/uninstalled using sudo apt-get install <package> or sudo apt-get remove package (I recommend reading about apt-get and sudo). Instead of Windows registry, there are many small configuration files in Linux, and some software makes changes to them so it should be carefully uninstalled (but Debian package management usually handles these cases well).

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