Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I'm looking for a clean way to migrate numpy arrays to latex bmatrix. It should work for both 2d arrays and horizontal and vertical 1d array.

Example

A = array([[12, 5, 2],
           [20, 4, 8],
           [ 2, 4, 3],
           [ 7, 1,10]])

print A              #2d array
print A[0]           #horizontal array
print A[:,0, None]   #vertical array

array_to_bmatrix(A)
array_to_bmatrix(A[0])
array_to_bmatrix(A[:,0, None])

Out:

[[12  5  2]
 [20  4  8]
 [ 2  4  3]
 [ 7  1 10]]

[12  5  2]

[[12]
 [20]
 [ 2]
 [ 7]]

\begin{bmatrix} 
 12.000 & 5.000 & 2.000 & \\
 20.000 & 4.000 & 8.000 & \\
 2.000 & 4.000 & 3.000 & \\
 7.000 & 1.000 & 10.000 & \\
\end{bmatrix}

\begin{bmatrix} 
 12.000 & 5.000 & 2.000
\end{bmatrix}

\begin{bmatrix} 
 12.000 & \\
 20.000 & \\
 2.000 & \\
 7.000 & \\
\end{bmatrix}

Attempt of solution

def array_to_bmatrix(array):
    begin = '\\begin{bmatrix} \n'
    data = ''
    for line in array:        
        if line.size == 1:
            data = data + ' %.3f &'%line
            data = data + r' \\'
            data = data + '\n'
            continue
        for element in line:
            data = data + ' %.3f &'%element

        data = data + r' \\'
        data = data + '\n'
    end = '\end{bmatrix}'
    print begin + data + end  

This solution works for vertical and 2d arrays, however it outputs horizontal arrays as vertical ones.

array_to_bmatrix(A[0])

Out:

\begin{bmatrix} 
 12.000 & \\
 5.000 & \\
 2.000 & \\
\end{bmatrix}
share|improve this question

2 Answers 2

up vote 3 down vote accepted

The __str__ method of the numpy array already does most of the formatting for you. Let's exploit that;

import numpy as np

def bmatrix(a):
    """Returns a LaTeX bmatrix

    :a: numpy array
    :returns: LaTeX bmatrix as a string
    """
    if len(a.shape) > 2:
        raise ValueError('bmatrix can at most display two dimensions')
    lines = str(a).replace('[', '').replace(']', '').splitlines()
    rv = [r'\begin{bmatrix}']
    rv += ['  ' + ' & '.join(l.split()) + r'\\' for l in lines]
    rv +=  [r'\end{bmatrix}']
    return '\n'.join(rv)

A = np.array([[12, 5, 2], [20, 4, 8], [ 2, 4, 3], [ 7, 1, 10]])
print bmatrix(A) + '\n'

B = np.array([[1.2], [3.7], [0.2]])
print bmatrix(B) + '\n'

C = np.array([1.2, 9.3, 0.6, -2.1])
print bmatrix(C) + '\n'

This returns:

\begin{bmatrix}
  12 & 5 & 2\\
  20 & 4 & 8\\
  2 & 4 & 3\\
  7 & 1 & 10\\
\end{bmatrix}

\begin{bmatrix}
  1.2\\
  3.7\\
  0.2\\
\end{bmatrix}

\begin{bmatrix}
  1.2 & 9.3 & 0.6 & -2.1\\
\end{bmatrix}
share|improve this answer

When you do this:

    for line in array:

you are iterating over the first dimension of array. When the array is 1-D, you end up iterating over the values. You need to ensure that array is really 2-D before doing this iteration. One way is to pass the argument through numpy.atleast_2d:

import numpy as np

def array_to_bmatrix(array):
    array = np.atleast_2d(array)
    begin = '\\begin{bmatrix} \n'
    data = ''
    for line in array:

etc.

share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.