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Within code I want to do something like this:

item.Stage = Stage.Values.ONE;

Where Stage.Values.ONE represents some predefined Stage:

public class Stage
{
    [Key]
    public virtual int StageId { get; set; }
    public string Name { get; set; }
    public TimeSpan Span { get; set; }
}

I'm dealing with EF CodeFirst... and I have a lot of stages to define. I'm not sure if I should store the data in the database, or in the dbContext, or what, but I'm looking for the simplest implementation.

I've tried this:

I've tried the following (defining two constants):

public class Stage
{
    [Key]
    public virtual int StageId { get; set; }
    public string Name { get; set; }
    public TimeSpan Span { get; set; }

    public static class Values
    {
        public static readonly Stage ONE = new Stage()
            {
                StageId = 0,
                Name = "ONE",
                Span = new TimeSpan(0, 0, 0)
            };
        public static readonly Stage TWO = new Stage()
        {
            StageId = 1,
            Name = "TWO",
            Span = new TimeSpan(0, 0, 10)
        };
}

But whenever I create a new instance of an entity that has a Stage, a new Stage is added to the db. I just need a few constant stages.

Use of Stage:

public class Side
{
    public Side()
    {
        Stage = Stage.Values.ONE;  // Adds new Stage to DB, when it should be a reference to the one I defined above
    }
    public virtual Stage Stage { get; set; }
}
share|improve this question

2 Answers 2

up vote 2 down vote accepted

It looks a bit like an enum, and I've used a kind of 'extended enum' patter several times before with some success. Because you're refencing these values in code, it may not make sense to store them in the database as well, but it's possible if needed.

The technique is described in detail here: http://lostechies.com/jimmybogard/2008/08/12/enumeration-classes/

Basically, you create a base class which provides a number of services similar to an enum, and then to create your "enumerated class" you inherit from it and provide a bunch of static instances which call the constructor with however many properties you need to have.

To avoid link rot, here is the base class to use (just put the whole class into your project somewhere), and scroll down for your own code.

public abstract class Enumeration : IComparable
{
    private readonly int _value;
    private readonly string _displayName;

    protected Enumeration()
    {
    }

    protected Enumeration(int value, string displayName)
    {
        _value = value;
        _displayName = displayName;
    }

    public int Value
    {
        get { return _value; }
    }

    public string DisplayName
    {
        get { return _displayName; }
    }

    public override string ToString()
    {
        return DisplayName;
    }

    public static IEnumerable<T> GetAll<T>() where T : Enumeration, new()
    {
        var type = typeof(T);
        var fields = type.GetFields(BindingFlags.Public | BindingFlags.Static | BindingFlags.DeclaredOnly);

        foreach (var info in fields)
        {
            var instance = new T();
            var locatedValue = info.GetValue(instance) as T;

            if (locatedValue != null)
            {
                yield return locatedValue;
            }
        }
    }

    public override bool Equals(object obj)
    {
        var otherValue = obj as Enumeration;

        if (otherValue == null)
        {
            return false;
        }

        var typeMatches = GetType().Equals(obj.GetType());
        var valueMatches = _value.Equals(otherValue.Value);

        return typeMatches && valueMatches;
    }

    public override int GetHashCode()
    {
        return _value.GetHashCode();
    }

    public static int AbsoluteDifference(Enumeration firstValue, Enumeration secondValue)
    {
        var absoluteDifference = Math.Abs(firstValue.Value - secondValue.Value);
        return absoluteDifference;
    }

    public static T FromValue<T>(int value) where T : Enumeration, new()
    {
        var matchingItem = parse<T, int>(value, "value", item => item.Value == value);
        return matchingItem;
    }

    public static T FromDisplayName<T>(string displayName) where T : Enumeration, new()
    {
        var matchingItem = parse<T, string>(displayName, "display name", item => item.DisplayName == displayName);
        return matchingItem;
    }

    private static T parse<T, K>(K value, string description, Func<T, bool> predicate) where T : Enumeration, new()
    {
        var matchingItem = GetAll<T>().FirstOrDefault(predicate);

        if (matchingItem == null)
        {
            var message = string.Format("'{0}' is not a valid {1} in {2}", value, description, typeof(T));
            throw new ApplicationException(message);
        }

        return matchingItem;
    }

    public int CompareTo(object other)
    {
        return Value.CompareTo(((Enumeration)other).Value);
    }
}

And now your code will look something like this:

public class Stage : Enumeration
{
    public TimeSpan TimeSpan { get; private set; }

    public static readonly Stage One
        = new Stage (1, "Stage one", new TimeSpan(5));
    public static readonly Stage Two
        = new Stage (2, "Stage two", new TimeSpan(10));
    public static readonly Stage Three
        = new Stage (3, "Stage three", new TimeSpan(15));

    private EmployeeType() { }
    private EmployeeType(int value, string displayName, TimeSpan span) : base(value, displayName) 
    { 
        TimeSpan = span;
    }
}

Once you have that set up, you can just store the .Value in the database. I'm afraid I haven't done it in EF, but in nHibernate it's reasonably straight-forward to tell a property to just store the ".Value" of the property, and you can wire it back up when you load the value by having it call:

Stage.FromValue<Stage>(intValue);
share|improve this answer
    
Damn. Thanks dude, this is incredible. –  SB2055 Jun 16 '13 at 1:53
    
No probs - I've used it heaps and it's so handy for this kind of situation. –  Rophuine Jun 16 '13 at 1:54

Hold the Stage as a property of your entity, use it the way you're doing and add

Ignore(x => x.Stage)

to your mapping. This will ignore this property when mapping to your database.

Edit: I misinterpreted the question.

If you want just the different stages in your database, you should put the stages in their own table with an ID, and refer to that ID trough a relationship. Every entity will hold an additional reference and you'll have to define relationships for them.

Is this what you were looking for?

share|improve this answer
    
Thanks. I'd like the Stage property to be stored in the DB, I just don't need duplicate stages to be created. My entity currently holds Stage as well... but creating a new entity creates a new stage, which it shouldn't. Updated my post to show an entity that uses Stage –  SB2055 Jun 16 '13 at 1:21
    
Updated my post with an additional suggestion. –  Jeroen Vannevel Jun 16 '13 at 1:25

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