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Say I have a function called everythird that takes a list as its parameter and returns a new list containing every third element of the original list, starting from index 0. I know how to do this using slice notation (return everythird[0::3]), but we have to use a while loop only. If I type in everythird([1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8]), I want it to return [1, 4, 7]. I tried a few different ways, but I'm not getting a list back, or I only get one value back. How do I return a list? Also how do you know for certain whether something modifies or doesn't modify an original list?

Thank you.

This is one of the ways I attempted this: every_third([1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11])

def everythird(l):
    '''(list) -> list
    Returns every third element of original list, starting at index 0'''

    i = 0
    while i < len(l):
        print(l[i])
        i += 3

This prints

1
4
7
share|improve this question
    
You don't have any return statement in there at all. – David Robinson Jun 16 '13 at 1:20
1  
Just yield l[i] instead of print; the caller function can use list() to get a list – mshsayem Jun 16 '13 at 1:20
    
@mshsayem: That would return an iterator, not a list. It's a good way to do that but I'm not sure it's what the OP wants. – David Robinson Jun 16 '13 at 1:21
up vote 5 down vote accepted

If you need to do this with a while loop, you could do it by appending each element to a list rather than printing it, and then returning that list:

def everythird(l):
    i = 0
    ret = []
    while i < len(l):
        ret.append(l[i])
        i += 3
    return ret

Though as you note, it would certainly be preferably to do

def everythird(l):
    return l[0::3]

Or if you were allowed to use a for loop:

def everythird(l):
    ret = []
    for i in range(0, len(l), 3):
        ret.append(l[i])
    return ret

Finally, if you were allowed to use a list comprehension:

def everythird(l):
    return [l[i] for i in range(0, len(l), 3)]

The slice indexing is certainly the best, but in any case a while loop might be the worst way to do it.

share|improve this answer
    
Thanks for your help David! One thing though, I noticed you have the append method for your solution with the while loop. How would you bring about the same result without using a method and only a while loop? Is that possible? Thanks again – user2489861 Jun 16 '13 at 1:37
    
@user2489861: That's an odd requirement. I suppose if you had to avoid a method, you could do ret += [l[i]] instead, though that's just implicitly using the extend method. But are you sure you want to produce a list rather than an iterator (like a list that can be iterated over once?) If you wanted to create an iterator, you could just do yield l[i] in each iteration. – David Robinson Jun 16 '13 at 1:49
    
Yes, this is exactly what I wanted to know! It's definitely not the most efficient way to go about it, but I wanted to know how I would do this using only the while loop. Thank you very much!! – user2489861 Jun 16 '13 at 2:07

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