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I'm learning exception handling in C++ and run into a problem. Here's the code:

#include<iostream>
#include<exception>

using namespace std;

class A
{
public:
    virtual void f(void){}
};

class AA:public A
{
public:
    void aa(void){};

};

int main(void)
{

    A a;
    try
    {
        dynamic_cast<AA>(a).aa();
    }
    catch(exception ex)
    {
        cout<<"["<<ex.what()<<"]"<<endl;
    }
    return 0;
}

So I thought the try catch will allow the function to execute and show me the content of the exception, but my compiler does not compile it. I'm using codeblock with GNU GCC. Please help me and show me what I need to do to get the code run as I intended. thanks a lot.

share|improve this question
    
You're getting a compiler error. It's important for you to share that error in your question so you can learn to read and understand them. – Drew Dormann Jun 16 '13 at 2:51
    
sure. "cannot dynamic_cast 'a'(of type 'class A') to type 'class AA'(target is not pointer or reference) – focusHard Jun 16 '13 at 2:53
1  
Which is the main problem here. dynamic_cast works on pointer or reference types. AA is not a pointer or reference type. – Chad Jun 16 '13 at 2:57
    
Since you're learning exception handling: the best way to catch exception is by const reference - that is catch(const std::exception& ex) – milleniumbug Jun 16 '13 at 3:03

dynamic_cast can only cast to a pointer value or reference, which is exactly what the error is telling you.

From $5.2.7/1 of the C++ Standard.

The result of the expression dynamic_cast< T >(v) is the result of converting the expression v to type T. T shall be a pointer or reference to a complete class type, or “pointer to cv void.”

In order for dynamic_cast to throw an exception when the object cannot be converted you need to cast to a reference. Change it to the following:

dynamic_cast<AA&>(a).aa();
//           ^^^ cast to reference.

As Johnsyweb pointed out dynamic_cast will always throw std::bad_cast when the conversion fails. Although std::bad_cast is derived from std::exception it is always a good idea to use the exception which best fits the expected fail condition. This prevents inadvertently interpreting other errors as an unsuccessful cast.

To apply this to your example it might look like the code below.

#include <iostream>
#include <typeinfo> // std::bad_cast

class A
{
public:
    virtual void f(void){}
};

class AA:public A
{
public:
    void aa(void){};
};

int main(void)
{
    A a;

    try
    {
        dynamic_cast<AA&>(a).aa();
    }
    catch(const std::bad_cast& ex)
    {
        std::cout << "["<<ex.what()<<"]" << std::endl;
    }
    return 0;
}

[Note, doing things like using namespace std; is strongly discouraged as it can cause conflicts with identifiers in the global namespace. I have removed it in the example above.]

share|improve this answer
    
thanks, your explanation is very clear – focusHard Jun 16 '13 at 3:05
    
after modifying my code to <AA&>, the program outputs [std::exception]. how do I get to std::bad_cast? can you please illustrate "it is always a good idea to use the exception which best fits the expected fail condition" using code example? thanks – focusHard Jun 16 '13 at 3:16
    
@focusHard, put a catch(std::bad_cast& e) above the existing catch() block. And #include<typeinfo>. – iammilind Jun 16 '13 at 3:23
2  
@focusHard bad_cast is in the typeinfo header. I have updated my answer to include the necessary changes to your example. Another thing you should do is start using cppreference.com as a reference. It gives lists the relevant header files and usually provides examples. It can be a great help when learning C++. – Captain Obvlious Jun 16 '13 at 3:25
    
it works now, thank you – focusHard Jun 16 '13 at 3:33

Your problem is not with exception handling, but with your dynamic cast:

'AA' is not a reference or pointer

dynamic_cast safely converts pointers and references to classes and not instances.

So you could do:

dynamic_cast<AA&>(a).aa();

...which will always fail and throw a std::bad_cast exception.

You should catch the most-specific type of exception that you are expecting and since the recommended way to catch is by reference, you should prefer:

catch (std::bad_cast const& ex)

Further reading: dynamic_cast conversion on cppreference.com.

share|improve this answer
    
I tried catch(std::bad_cast const& ex) as you suggested but get several error messages. "expected type-specifier","expected unqualified-id before 'const'" – focusHard Jun 16 '13 at 3:26
1  
std::bad_cast is defined in header <typeinfo>. You'll need to #include this. – Johnsyweb Jun 16 '13 at 3:28

You are getting a compiler error because your dynamic_cast is not on pointer or reference.
Change it to:

dynamic_cast<AA&>(a).aa();

... and you get the proper exception thrown.

On side note: Smart compilers like g++ would warn as well:
warning: dynamic_cast on an object (here a) can never succeed.

So it's better to limit such code for toying around. In production quality code, the dynamic_cast should be performed only on pointer/reference.

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