Stack Overflow is a community of 4.7 million programmers, just like you, helping each other.

Join them; it only takes a minute:

Sign up
Join the Stack Overflow community to:
  1. Ask programming questions
  2. Answer and help your peers
  3. Get recognized for your expertise

I have viewed many similar questions and I have yet to find a solution. Currently, -1.978569 is the output instead of -7.9142766. I am trying to match the output of this page: http://babbage.cs.qc.cuny.edu/IEEE-754.old/32bit.html

Thank you for your time!

Here is my code:

#include <stdio.h>
#include <math.h>

float IEEE_754_to_Float(const unsigned char b[4]) {
        int sign = (b[0] >> 7) ? -1 : 1;

        unsigned int fraction_bits = ((b[1] & 0x7F) << 16) + (b[2] << 8) + b[3];

        float fraction = 0.5f;
        unsigned char ii;
        for (ii = 0; ii < 24; ++ii)
                fraction += ldexpf((fraction_bits >> (23 - ii)) & 1, -(ii + 1));

        float significand = sign * fraction;

        return ldexpf(significand, 1);
}

int main() {
    unsigned char b[]={0xC0, 0xFD, 0x41, 0xC1};
    float f=IEEE_754_to_Float(b);
    printf("%f\n",f);
    return(0); }
share|improve this question
1  
Your program doesn't use the exponent part of the floating point number anywhere - that's probably a problem. – Carl Norum Jun 16 '13 at 4:38
1  
Welcome to Stack Overflow. Good first question! – John Jun 16 '13 at 5:14
    
My exponent-calculating code was wrong, so it was returning -inf and inf. That is why I removed it. The other code on this page works. Thanks! Thanks for the warm welcome, John! – user2490045 Jun 16 '13 at 6:00
    
why don't use union { unsigned char b[4]; float f } or just memcpy(&f, b, sizeof(f)) – Lưu Vĩnh Phúc Jan 5 '14 at 1:32

You have a few errors.

First, you're ignoring the exponent field. Those are in bits 30-23:

int exponentField = ((b[0] & 0x7F) << 1) + (b[1] >> 7);

Second, there's a leading 1 assumed with the significant. (Also, there are only 23 significand bits, so your loop should really only go up to 23, but since you're just adding 0 it doesn't matter too much.) If you change the loop to the following:

float fraction = 1.0f;
unsigned char ii;
for (ii = 0; ii < 24; ++ii)
    fraction += ldexpf((fraction_bits >> (23 - ii)) & 1, -ii);

it should be fine.

Lastly, you'll need to account for the exponent, which is calculated from exponentField:

return ldexpf(significand, exponentField - 127);
share|improve this answer
1  
+1, but the change to 1.0f has to be accompanied by a fix in the loop, too. The exponent should just be -ii, rather than -(ii + 1), right? – Carl Norum Jun 16 '13 at 4:51
    
Yes, that fixed it, and it works (via codepad.org). Good catch. I still have to convince myself why that is, though: first time around aren't you wanting to add to the first place to the right of the decimal? ldexpf(1, 0) is 1, not 0.5 (0.1 in binary), right? (Thanks for the ++) – John Jun 16 '13 at 5:02
    
Edited my response based on Carl Norum's catch. – John Jun 16 '13 at 5:07
    
This solved the problem. Thanks! – user2490045 Jun 16 '13 at 6:01
    
@John, on closer inspection it's the loop indices - they should actually only go 0-22 and the subtraction should be 22 - ii. There are 23 bits of mantissa, not 24. I guess that would be a better fix than the exponent change I suggested. As it stands, the first time through the loop just adds 0 every time. – Carl Norum Jun 16 '13 at 17:16

Exponent bits are 129, offset by 127 = 2. -1.978569 * (2 ** 2) = -7.9142766.

share|improve this answer
    
++. I'm still a little puzzled why he got so close to 1/4 of the correct answer. He started his significand at 0.5, not 1.0. – John Jun 16 '13 at 5:14
    
Looks like offsetting errors: his original code looped over 24 bits of mantissa instead of 23. The first time through the loop, it picked up the LSB of the exponent, which is a 1, and added ldexp(1.0, -1), which happens to be 0.5. – Lee Daniel Crocker Jun 16 '13 at 6:44

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.