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I'm trying to draw with the mouse over a HTML5 canvas, but the only way that it seems to work well is if the canvas is in the position 0,0 (upper left corner) if I change the canvas position, for some reason it doesn't draw like it should. Here is my code.

 function createImageOnCanvas(imageId){
    document.getElementById("imgCanvas").style.display = "block";
    document.getElementById("images").style.overflowY= "hidden";
    var canvas = document.getElementById("imgCanvas");
    var context = canvas.getContext("2d");
    var img = new Image(300,300);
    img.src = document.getElementById(imageId).src;
    context.drawImage(img, (0),(0));


}

function draw(e){
    var canvas = document.getElementById("imgCanvas");
    var context = canvas.getContext("2d");
    posx = e.clientX;
    posy = e.clientY;
    context.fillStyle = "#000000";
    context.fillRect (posx, posy, 4, 4);
}

The HTML part

 <body>
 <div id="images">
 </div>
 <canvas onmousemove="draw(event)" style="margin:0;padding:0;" id="imgCanvas"
          class="canvasView" width="250" height="250"></canvas> 

I have read there's a way of creating a simple function in JavaScript to get the right position, but I have no idea about how to do it.

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4 Answers 4

up vote 14 down vote accepted

You can get the mouse positions by using this snippet:

function getMousePos(canvas, evt) {
    var rect = canvas.getBoundingClientRect();
    return {
      x: evt.clientX - rect.left,
      y: evt.clientY - rect.top
    };
}

Just call it from your event with the event and canvas as arguments. It returns an object with x and y for the mouse positions.

As the mouse position you are getting is relative to the whole window you'll have to subtract the position of the element (here: canvas) to get it relative to the element. Canvas offers a neat boundary object which makes this rather simple as shown above.

Example of integration in your code:

//put this outside the event loop..
var canvas = document.getElementById("imgCanvas");
var context = canvas.getContext("2d");

function draw(e){
    var pos = getMousePos(canvas, e);
    posx = pos.x;
    posy = pos.y;

    context.fillStyle = "#000000";
    context.fillRect (posx, posy, 4, 4);
}

Working demo (with some modifications):
http://jsfiddle.net/AbdiasSoftware/ds9s7/

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1  
Perfect! it worked like a charm! actually, im totally new to html5 and the canvas element, so it took me a while to get a nice understanding of this. Thanks!!! –  Solar Confinement Jun 16 '13 at 16:13
1  
getBoundingRectangle() gives more exact co-ordinates than canvas.getOffset(); –  poorva Jan 30 '14 at 6:49

You need to get the mouse position relative to the canvas

To do that you need to know the X/Y position of the canvas on the page.

This is called the canvas’s “offset”, and here’s how to get the offset. (I’m using jQuery in order to simplify cross-browser compatibility, but if you want to use raw javascript a quick Google will get that too).

    var canvasOffset=$("#canvas").offset();
    var offsetX=canvasOffset.left;
    var offsetY=canvasOffset.top;

Then in your mouse handler, you can get the mouse X/Y like this:

  function handleMouseDown(e){
      mouseX=parseInt(e.clientX-offsetX);
      mouseY=parseInt(e.clientY-offsetY);
}

Here is an illustrating code and fiddle that shows how to successfully track mouse events on the canvas:

http://jsfiddle.net/m1erickson/WB7Zu/

<!doctype html>
<html>
<head>
<link rel="stylesheet" type="text/css" media="all" href="css/reset.css" /> <!-- reset css -->
<script type="text/javascript" src="http://code.jquery.com/jquery.min.js"></script>

<style>
    body{ background-color: ivory; }
    canvas{border:1px solid red;}
</style>

<script>
$(function(){

    var canvas=document.getElementById("canvas");
    var ctx=canvas.getContext("2d");

    var canvasOffset=$("#canvas").offset();
    var offsetX=canvasOffset.left;
    var offsetY=canvasOffset.top;

    function handleMouseDown(e){
      mouseX=parseInt(e.clientX-offsetX);
      mouseY=parseInt(e.clientY-offsetY);
      $("#downlog").html("Down: "+ mouseX + " / " + mouseY);

      // Put your mousedown stuff here

    }

    function handleMouseUp(e){
      mouseX=parseInt(e.clientX-offsetX);
      mouseY=parseInt(e.clientY-offsetY);
      $("#uplog").html("Up: "+ mouseX + " / " + mouseY);

      // Put your mouseup stuff here
    }

    function handleMouseOut(e){
      mouseX=parseInt(e.clientX-offsetX);
      mouseY=parseInt(e.clientY-offsetY);
      $("#outlog").html("Out: "+ mouseX + " / " + mouseY);

      // Put your mouseOut stuff here
    }

    function handleMouseMove(e){
      mouseX=parseInt(e.clientX-offsetX);
      mouseY=parseInt(e.clientY-offsetY);
      $("#movelog").html("Move: "+ mouseX + " / " + mouseY);

      // Put your mousemove stuff here

    }

    $("#canvas").mousedown(function(e){handleMouseDown(e);});
    $("#canvas").mousemove(function(e){handleMouseMove(e);});
    $("#canvas").mouseup(function(e){handleMouseUp(e);});
    $("#canvas").mouseout(function(e){handleMouseOut(e);});

}); // end $(function(){});
</script>

</head>

<body>
    <p>Move, press and release the mouse</p>
    <p id="downlog">Down</p>
    <p id="movelog">Move</p>
    <p id="uplog">Up</p>
    <p id="outlog">Out</p>
    <canvas id="canvas" width=300 height=300></canvas>

</body>
</html>
share|improve this answer
    
Instead of $("#canvas").offset(); and then taking left and top i was using $("#canvas").offsetLeft , so the relative position was not right ! –  poorva Jan 28 '14 at 10:57

You don't need javascript. Set position:relative; in your css for the canvas element. It's a lot cleaner coding than running a script to constantly correct coordinates.

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Refer this question: The mouseEvent.offsetX I am getting is much larger than actual canvas size .I have given a function there which will exactly suit in your situation

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