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I am deriving a class from base abstract class. My abstract class has four abstract methods. I don't want to override all methods in derived class. How should I do that, without declaring the derived class as abstract class?

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closed as not constructive by Henk Holterman, George Duckett, Joe, Bhavin, Robert Jun 17 '13 at 12:39

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Why would you want to do this? The whole idea of abstract methods is that you have to override them. –  user2032433 Jun 16 '13 at 6:48
    
Most probably you want virtual methods to override in your derived class –  OzrenTkalcecKrznaric Jun 16 '13 at 6:51
1  
I creating a base class for my project architecture, and this question strikes in my mind, I know this is not possible, but i think there is some trick or something else to achieve this. –  Vishwajeet Jun 16 '13 at 6:51
2  
There's no trick. But even if there were one, why would you need it? Just mark your base class as abstract and move on. If you want a default empty implementation to that method, just add one. –  zmbq Jun 16 '13 at 6:53
1  
Could you explain why you would want to do this? It doesn't really make logical sense. What would you expect to happen if you created an object of the child type, and then called one of the unimplemented abstract methods? –  dlev Jun 16 '13 at 7:04

2 Answers 2

A non-abstract class derived from an abstract class must include actual implementations of all inherited abstract methods and accessors(MSDN)

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You cant do that. When you bypass, you mean to not implement them. That means the derived class isn't fully constructed. How can you instantiate an instance of such a type? Such types should indeed be non-instantiable, aka abstract.

But there are ways you can ignore such ignorable methods in derived class during run time though. You can make it virtual so that its meant for further derived classes to override (and throw exceptions at run time)

abstract class Vehicle
{
    public abstract void Do();
}

class Car : Vehicle
{ 
    public virtual void Do(){ throw InvalidOperationException(); }
}

class Hyundai : Car
{ 
    public override void Do(){ //implementation }
}

Perhaps an alternative is to make your base class an interface and explicitly implement them in derived class (which would hide it to an extent).

interface Vehicle
{
    void Do();
}

class Car : Vehicle
{
    void Vehicle.Do()
    {
        throw new InvalidOperationException();
    }
}

class Hyundai : Car
{
    //Do is not available here unless you cast it to base type, ie Vehicle
}
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2  
Do not use NotImplementedException for this purpose. If the intention you want to express is "the operation is invalid" then use InvalidOperationException. Use NotImplementedException during development as a marker for code that will be developed but is not done yet, and then remove them all before you ship. If you use NotImplementedException to mean both "this is intentionally not implemented" and "this is intended to be implemented", you're setting yourself up for confusing bugs. –  Eric Lippert Jun 16 '13 at 16:07
    
@EricLippert fair point, makes sense, thanks. Will update it. –  nawfal Jun 16 '13 at 16:08

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