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I have a worker class like the one below:

class Worker{
public:
  int Do(){
    int ret = 100;
    // do stuff
    return ret;
  }
}

It's intended to be executed with boost::thread and boost::bind, like:

Worker worker;
boost::function<int()> th_func = boost::bind(&Worker::Do, &worker);
boost::thread th(th_func);
th.join();

My question is, how do I get the return value of Worker::Do?

Thanks in advance.

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5 Answers 5

up vote 6 down vote accepted

I don't think you can get the return value.

Instead, you can store the value as a member of Worker:

class Worker{
public:
  void Do(){
    int ret = 100;
    // do stuff
    m_ReturnValue = ret;
  }
  int m_ReturnValue;
}

And use it like so:

Worker worker;
boost::function<void()> th_func = boost::bind(&Worker::Do, &worker);
boost::thread th(th_func);
th.join();
//do something with worker.m_ReturnValue
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Thanks I guess I have to redesign a bit. –  He Shiming Nov 12 '09 at 1:56

Another option is to use promises/futures.

class Worker{
public:
  void Do( boost::promise<int> & p){
    int ret = 100;
    // do stuff
    p.set_value(ret);
  }
};
//Later...
boost::promise<int> p;
boost::thread t( boost::bind(&Worker::Do, &worker, boost::ref(p));
int retval = p.get_future().get(); //This will block until the promise is set.

And if you can use c++0x, then using std::async will package up all of the above and just do:

std::future<int> f = std::async( std::bind(&Worker::Do, &worker) );
int retval = f.get(); //Will block until do returns an int.
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In addition, you also have some redundant calls to boost::bind() and boost::function(). You can instead do the following:

class Worker{
    public:
       void operator(){
          int ret = 100;
          // do stuff
          m_ReturnValue = ret;
       }
    int m_ReturnValue;
}

Worker worker;
boost::thread th(worker());//or boost::thread th(boost::ref(worker));

You can do this because Thread's constructor is a convenience wrapper around an internal bind() call. Thread Constructor with arguments

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That looks quite straightforward. Thanks but my actual implementation contains many member functions, so I can't really use the () operator. –  He Shiming Nov 12 '09 at 1:58
    
@He Shiming: You can still use it without bind(). For example, boost::thread(worker(),&Worker::Do) (The syntax may be slightly off since its the top of my of head). –  Imran.Fanaswala Nov 12 '09 at 10:14
class Worker{
public:
  int Do(){
  int ret = 100;
  // do stuff
  return ret;
  }
}

Worker worker;
boost::packaged_task<int> ptask(boost::bind(&Worker::Do, &worker));
boost::unique_future<int> future_int = ptask.get_future();
boost::thread th(boost::move(ptask));
th.join();
if (future_int.is_ready())
   int return_value = future_int.get();

You can take a look at the "boost::future" concept, ref this link

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Another option is using the Boost.Lambda library. Then you can write the code as follows without changing the Worker class:

Worker worker;
int ret;
boost::thread th( boost::lambda::var( ret ) = worker.Do() );
th.join();

This is useful in particular when you cannot change the function to call. Like this, the return value is wrapped in a local variable ret.

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4  
This will execute worker.Do() in the current thread, copy the result into a lambda object, run that lambda on the new thread (thus assigning the result of worker.Do() to ret), and then wait for the execution of the new thread to complete. This is most likely not the desired behaviour, because it executes worker.Do() in the wrong thread. The easiest correct way to get results back from a function executed in a different thread is to use futures and promises. –  Mankarse Jan 31 '12 at 16:58

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