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Below is the structure of my emp table:

Name                 Null?    Type
------------------ -------- ------------
EMP_ID             NOT NULL NUMBER
EMP_NAME                    VARCHAR2(20)
DEPT_ID                     NUMBER
AGE                         NUMBER
SEX                         VARCHAR2(5)

If I use the below RECORD TYPE definition then it works:

declare
type rec_emp is record(empid emp.emp_id%TYPE, empname emp.emp_name%type, empdept emp.dept_id%type, empage emp.age%type, empsex emp.sex%type);
v_emprecord rec_emp;
begin
v_emprecord.empid := 11;
v_emprecord.empname := 'Alen';
v_emprecord.empdept := 2;
v_emprecord.empage := 27;
v_emprecord.empsex := 'M';
update emp set ROW = v_emprecord where emp_id = 11;
dbms_output.put_line('Rows Updated: ' || sql%rowcount);
end;

But again, if I try out this code then it does not work (here I reduced the number of columns in the RECORD TYPE variable):

declare
type rec_emp is record(empname emp.emp_name%type, empdept emp.dept_id%type);
v_emprecord rec_emp;
begin
v_emprecord.empname := 'Alen';
v_emprecord.empdept := 2;
update emp set ROW = v_emprecord where emp_id = 11;
dbms_output.put_line('Rows Updated: ' || sql%rowcount);
end;

The error is : PL/SQL: ORA-00913: too many values

In my case, I don't need all the columns to be declared on a RECORD TYPE, hence tried reducing the number of columns in RECORD TYPE declaration. Any specific reason for such kind of a behavior?

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2 Answers 2

up vote 3 down vote accepted

You cannot update a pratial row with the ROW keyword using a record.

From the docs

Updating the Database with PL/SQL Record Values

A PL/SQL-only extension of the UPDATE statement lets you update database rows using a single variable of type RECORD or %ROWTYPE on the right side of the SET clause, instead of a list of fields.

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Oracle can't be expected to know which column(s) you've left out of your record type, so it can't know which table colmns to map the record fields too.

You might consider that it should be able to work it out becuase you used the %type in the record definition. But that just makes this a special case in the more general construct. You could have used explicit types, e.g. varchar2 and number, or different source tables, e.g. dept.dept_id%type, and it would still work in the first instance where all columns are 'mapped'; but in the second it would be impossible to know the column to field relationship.

It might be possible for Oracle to guess or assume what you intended in some cases, but it would mean it had to do a lot more work, would behave differently in different circumstances, and perhaps more importantly relying on those assumptions might mean that it ends up not actually doing what you meant, which would be dangerous for your code.

If you really want to use the ROW option you could declare the other fields too but with null or other defaults; but that would then overwrite any existing column values with your default values, which probably isn't what you want. Or select the existing values into your record. Otherwise you'd have to specify the colmns individually in the update, which would be more normal. I'm not sure why you'd want to use a record at all here, rather than a simple update setting the two columns you care about directly:

update emp
set empname = 'Alen', empdept = 2
where empid = 11;
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Thanks for the explanation... I was trying out a simple example for using ROW, otherwise you are correct that the scenario does not demands ROW usage. –  user182944 Jun 16 '13 at 11:20

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