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I've started learning C++, and try to make a game while doing so, in order to have something exciting to do. I've made my project (using Netbeans), with main and another class to handle some of the logic. Before I went to deep into the logics, I made a test to see if everything were as supposed. Compiling went through without problems, but when I run my project I don't see the wanted text in the console. I've tried cout it from main.cpp as well as the object class itself, but no luck either way (no output from getCharacterName).

I would be happy if you'd have time to take a quick look at my code below and point me in the right direction.

main.cpp

#include "character/info.h"
#include <iostream>

using namespace std;

info * character;

int main() {
    character = new info("PlayerName");
    character->getCharacterName();
    delete character;
}

info.h

#ifndef INFO_H
#define INFO_H

#include <iostream>

class info {
public:
    info(std::string) {};
    ~info() {};
    std::string getCharacterName() {};
}
#endif  /* INFO_H */

info.cpp

#include <iostream>

using namespace std;

class info {

        static string characterName;

    info(std::string charName) {
        cout<<"starting character";
        info::characterName = charName;
        cout<<"character made";
    }

    ~info() {
        cout<<"Object removed";
    }

public: void getCharacterName() {
        cout<< info::characterName;
    }
};

As mentioned earlier the last function has looked like below aswell, with the 'cout' in the main instead:

public: std::string getCharacterName() {
        return info::characterName;
}

Thanks in advance

//Pyracell

share|improve this question
    
you should avoid to declare global variables as you do with: info * character;, but instead declare it inside the main() function where you use it. The idea being, declare a symbol where you use it. –  zmo Jun 16 '13 at 11:36
    
you claim, that your code compiles, but it's not not even near to being compilable. –  Alexander Tobias Heinrich Jun 16 '13 at 11:40
    
@zmo I've removed the global variable and declare it in the main now. Thanks. –  Pyracell Jun 16 '13 at 12:44
    
@AlexanderTobiasHeinrich I've stripped some of the logic in order to make a light example for you to comment on, so that I could get the necessary understanding. I'm sorry the example wasn't compilable. My bad. –  Pyracell Jun 16 '13 at 12:45

2 Answers 2

up vote 2 down vote accepted

You declared empty functions in your .h file. When you separate the declaration and the definition you need to do like this:

info.h

#ifndef INFO_H
#define INFO_H

#include <string>

class info {
public:
    info(std::string);
    ~info();
    std::string getCharacterName();
private
    std::string name;
};

#endif

info.cpp

#include "info.h"

#include <iostream>
using std::cout;

info::info(std::string charName) : name(charName) {
    cout<<"character made";
}

info::~info() {
    cout<<"Object removed";
}

std::string info::getCharacterName() {
    return name;
}

As a side note, there is a couple things that are worth mentioning I think:

  • In your main.cpp, you declare a global variable to hold your character, this is generally something that we try to avoid
  • Still in your main.cpp, you create your character using new where doing info("MyCharacterName"); would probably be enough
  • Last point above shows that you declare an info but it is in fact a character that your class is modeling, maybe the class name info is not relevant
  • It is generally a good practise to start class names with an upper case

Keep working on this project, the best way to learn is to practice again and again...

share|improve this answer
    
Where is info::characterName declared? Where is it defined? –  Andrei Jun 16 '13 at 11:49
    
I just copied and paste the code without removing the content. It needs to be changed as well (well, most of the original code should be changed anyway) –  Uflex Jun 16 '13 at 11:51
    
There, it should be a bit better now. I still think that info is not a good name for this class but it's not for me to decide. –  Uflex Jun 16 '13 at 12:05
    
@Uflex thanks a lot. This helped me out. Just a bit of a wake up call, with the classes working this way. –  Pyracell Jun 16 '13 at 12:49

There are a number of issues here:

  • character is a global (avoid globals unless necessary)
  • character is allocated with new (use automatic storage when possible)
  • the header defines the methods as empty (due to the {})
  • getCharacterName in info.cpp has a different return value than the one in the header
  • characterName is a static and it only appears in info.cpp (in this case it should be an ordinary member; in any case, it needs to be declared in the header)
  • in the info.cpp file you use the class keyword (that will declare a new class Info meaning your code either won't compile or it will be very strange indeed), use info:info(std::string charName), info::~info() and std::string info::getCharacterName() to define the functions (check Uflex answer for details)
share|improve this answer
    
Thank you for the time you put into this post. I will go through every line, and try to optimize my code/making it clean. –  Pyracell Jun 16 '13 at 12:47

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