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Invoice has many invoice entries:

class Invoice < ActiveRecord::Base
  has_many :invoice_entries, :autosave => true, :dependent => :destroy
  validates_presence_of :date
end

class InvoiceEntry < ActiveRecord::Base
  belongs_to :invoice
  validates_presence_of :description
end

Assume we have a single invoice in the database:

id: 1
date: '2013-06-16'

and it has two invoice entries:

id: 10                           id: 11
invoice_id: 1                    invoice_id: 1
description: 'do A'              description: 'do C'

Now, I have the new invoice entries:

id: 10                               
description: 'do B'              description: 'do D'

(Existing invoice entry          (New invoice entry
 with updated description)        without id)

I would like the invoice to have only these new invoice entries (this means that invoice entry with id=11 should be deleted).

invoice.invoice_entries = new_invoice_entries seems to do half of the work. It removes the invoice entry with id=11, creates a new invoice entry with description 'Do D', but it doesn't update the description of invoice entry with id=10 from 'Do A' to 'Do B'. I guess that when Rails sees an existing id in new_invoice_entries, it totally ignores it. Is that true? If yes, what is the rationale behind this?

My full code is below. How would you fix this issue? (I use Rails 4, in case it simplifies the code.)


# PATCH/PUT /api/invoices/5
def update
  @invoice = Invoice.find(params[:id])
  errors = []

  # Invoice entries
  invoice_entries_params = params[:invoice_entries] || []
  invoice_entries = []

  for invoice_entry_params in invoice_entries_params
    if invoice_entry_params[:id].nil?
      invoice_entry = InvoiceEntry.new(invoice_entry_params)
      errors << invoice_entry.errors.messages.values if not invoice_entry.valid?
    else
      invoice_entry = InvoiceEntry.find_by_id(invoice_entry_params[:id])

      if invoice_entry.nil?
        errors << "Couldn't find invoice entry with id = #{invoice_entry_params[:id]}"
      else
        invoice_entry.assign_attributes(invoice_entry_params)
        errors << invoice_entry.errors.messages.values if not invoice_entry.valid?
      end
    end

    invoice_entries << invoice_entry
  end

  # Invoice
  @invoice.assign_attributes(date: params[:date])

  errors << @invoice.errors.messages.values if not @invoice.valid?

  if errors.empty?
    # Save everything
    @invoice.invoice_entries = invoice_entries
    @invoice.save

    head :no_content
  else
    render json: errors.flatten, status: :unprocessable_entity
  end
end
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2 Answers 2

up vote 0 down vote accepted

To change not only the association but also the attributes of the associated objects, you have to use accepts_nested_attributes_for:

class Invoice < ActiveRecord::Base
  has_many :invoice_entries, :autosave => true, :dependent => :destroy
  validates_presence_of :date
  accepts_nested_attributes_for :invoice_entries, allow_destroy: true
end

There's a railscast episode 196 on how to build dynamic nested forms using nested_attributes.

Addendum:

accepts_nested_attributes_for expects attributes for the nested models in a nested hash, i.e.:

invoice_params={"date" => '2013-06-16', 
  "invoice_entries_attributes" => [
    {"description" => "do A"},
    {"description" => "do B"}]
}

invoice= Invoice.new(invoice_params)
invoice.save

the save saves invoice and two invoice_items.

Now

invoice=Invoice.find(1)
invoice_params={
  "invoice_entries_attributes" => [
    {"description" => "do A"},
    {"description" => "do C"}]
}
invoice.update_attributes(invoice_params)

deletes the item do B and adds the item do C.

form_fields can be used to create forms that result in exaclty that kind of nested hashes.
For details see the railscast.

share|improve this answer
    
I tried to add accepts_nested_attributes_for :invoice_entries, but it doesn't make any difference. See also: stackoverflow.com/q/17142290/247243 –  Misha Moroshko Jun 17 '13 at 7:42
    
see my addendum –  Martin M Jun 18 '13 at 18:42

Try using accepts_nested_attributes_for. This would clean up a lot of your code! Here is a example:

class Invoice < ActiveRecord::Base
  has_many :invoice_entries, :dependent => :destroy
  validates_presence_of :date
  attr_accessible :invoice_entries_attributes

  accepts_nested_attributes_for :invoice_entries, :allow_destroy => true
end

In the view can you then use fields_for (simple_fields_for with simple form, and semantic_fields_for with formtastic if you use one of these gems).

<%= form_for @invoice do |invoice_form| %>
  <%= invoice_form.fields_for :invoice_entries do |invoice_entry_form| %>
    <%= invoice_entry_form.text_field :description %>
    <%= invoice_entry_form.check_box :_destroy %>
  <% end %>
<% end %>

In you controller can you now refactor down to the basics:

# PATCH/PUT /api/invoices/5
def update
  @invoice = Invoice.find(params[:id])
  if @invoice.update_attributes(params[:invoice]) # This also saves all associated invoice entries, and destroy all that is marked for destruction.
    head :no_content
  else
    render json: @invoice.errors.flatten, status: :unprocessable_entity
  end
end

You can read more about accepts_nested_attributes_for here: http://api.rubyonrails.org/classes/ActiveRecord/NestedAttributes/ClassMethods.html

Or you can watch this railscast about nested models: http://railscasts.com/episodes/196-nested-model-form-revised

share|improve this answer
    
Adding accepts_nested_attributes_for :invoice_entries doesn't help. See also: stackoverflow.com/q/17142290/247243 –  Misha Moroshko Jun 17 '13 at 7:43

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