Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.
blah = CInt(Int((7 * Rnd()) + 0))

Generates a random integer between 0 and 6.

How can I modify this to give me a random number with 2 decimal places, still between 0 and 6?

As suggested below, I'm now using this code, and it seems to work:

Dim prng As New Random

Private Function aRand() As Double
    Return Math.Round(prng.Next(0, 601) / 100, 2)
End Function

currentApp.statements(Pick, 7) = aRand()
currentApp.statements(Pick, 8) = aRand()

Thanks for all the suggestions.

share|improve this question
    
Do you mean between 0.00 and 6.99? –  dbasnett Jun 16 '13 at 14:41
    
stackoverflow.com/questions/609501/… –  Steve Jun 16 '13 at 14:43
    
Between 0.00 and 6.00 –  finisterre Jun 16 '13 at 14:45
    
Steve, I'm not good at converting C# code to VB.Net. –  finisterre Jun 16 '13 at 14:46
7  
Generate a number between 0 and 600. Divide by 100. It is certainly best to avoid dividing if you can, floating point numbers are not exact. –  Hans Passant Jun 16 '13 at 14:55

3 Answers 3

up vote 1 down vote accepted

Like this

Dim prng As New Random

Private Function aRand() As Double
    Return prng.Next(0, 601) / 100
End Function

note that the location of the random.

Your code would look like

    currentApp.statements(Pick, 7) = aRand()
    currentApp.statements(Pick, 8) = aRand()
share|improve this answer
2  
Your answer will not include 6.00 in its range. –  Neolisk Jun 16 '13 at 15:03
    
True, that exclusive upper bound... I'll fix it in place. –  dbasnett Jun 16 '13 at 15:07
    
See my original post which I have updated. Thanks. –  finisterre Jun 16 '13 at 15:11
    
I think you don't need a Round since your edit. Return prng.Next(0, 601) / 100 should work just fine. –  Neolisk Jun 16 '13 at 15:32

The OP says between 0.00 and 6.00, so I believe that the advice from @HansPassant is the best to try but enlarging the upper limit to 601 ( if he means the limits are inclusive of course)

Dim rnd As New Random
Dim x As Integer = rnd.Next(0, 601)
Dim d = x / 100
Console.WriteLine(d)
share|improve this answer
    
+1. Yep, this is probably the best option. –  Neolisk Jun 16 '13 at 15:05

Based on @Steve's answer, here is a generic implementation:

Function RandomDouble(maxValue As Integer, precision As Integer) As Double
  Dim rnd As New Random
  Dim scale As Double = 10 ^ precision
  Dim x As Integer = rnd.Next(0, maxValue * scale + 1)
  Return x / scale
End Function

And the usage (tested in an empty console app, sub main):

Dim dbl As Double = RandomDouble(6, 2)
Debug.WriteLine(dbl)

So you can reuse it like this:

currentApp.statements(Pick, 7) = RandomDouble(6, 2)
currentApp.statements(Pick, 8) = RandomDouble(6, 2)

Or with DRY principle (=don't repeat yourself):

For i As Integer = 7 To 8
  currentApp.statements(Pick, i) = RandomDouble(6, 2)
Next
share|improve this answer
    
I like generic! +1 –  dbasnett Jun 16 '13 at 15:20

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.