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Consider this Boost.Range and C++11 range-based for loop usage, it doesn't compile with MSVS 2012:

#include <iostream>
#include <vector>
#include <boost/container/vector.hpp>
#include <boost/range/algorithm/find.hpp>

int main()
{
    std::vector<int> vec;

    for(auto i : boost::find(vec, 1))
    {
        std::cout << "lolwut";
    }

    return 0;
}

Compiler output:

1>...\main.cpp(10): error C3312: no callable 'begin' function found for type 'boost::container::container_detail::vector_iterator<Pointer>'
1>          with
1>          [
1>              Pointer=int *
1>          ]
1>...\main.cpp(10): error C3312: no callable 'end' function found for type 'boost::container::container_detail::vector_iterator<Pointer>'
1>          with
1>          [
1>              Pointer=int *
1>          ]
1>
1>Build FAILED.

Boost.Range cannot be used inside range-based for loop? Or what do I do wrong? Thanks!

share|improve this question
1  
find returns iterator, not range. You can make another range using make_iterator_range – Igor R. Jun 16 '13 at 18:25
    
Oh, looks like my mistake. So range algorithms accepts ranges (but not returns), right? – nyan-cat Jun 16 '13 at 18:38
    
For each algorithm you can see what its return type is: boost.org/doc/libs/1_53_0/libs/range/doc/html/range/reference/… – Igor R. Jun 16 '13 at 19:00
    
Some range algorithms return ranges, others do not. The question what should find(range, value) return? has been debated many times. The two most popular answers have been: (a) return a range where the first element is == value (or empty if no element is equal), or (b) an iterator referencing the first items that compared equal. – Marshall Clow Jun 18 '13 at 15:31
    
(Part of) the problem is that the iterator-based find(begin, end, value) call implicitly returns two ranges; the first one is all the values that did not match [begin, return-value), and the second one is the range that begins with the matched value [return-value, end) - which is option (a) above – Marshall Clow Jun 18 '13 at 15:35

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