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I'm learning Java but I believe that this question is not language-specific. Sorry if someone has already asked the question, I'm not sure how to phrase this in a search query.

Shortly after implementing a few generic methods for myself, I came to realize that: Since Generics allow you to use parameters of more types, some of the arguments that the user puts in might not have the functionality that you expect. A "hack" that I came up with is to restrict the parameter input type using an interface as an Upper Bound. For popular functionalities like compareTo(), this is fine as the interface Comparable is popular enough, but I find it awkward that I have to write a custom interface just to get my generics to work.

Here's some code to help make sense of my nonsense. Consider the following non-working code that attempts to count unique elements in a collection of generic datatype:

public static <T> int countUnique(Collection<T> c) {
    int count = 0;
    for(T t : c) {
        count += (t.isUnique()) ? (1) : (0);
    }
    return count;
}

An obvious problem arises when the compiler complains that the objects t do not have (or rather, the compiler cannot determine that they have) the method isUnique(). My solution:

public interface unique {
    public boolean isUnique();
}

public static <T extends unique> int countUnique(Collection<T> c) {
    int count = 0;
    for(T t : c) {
        count += (t.isUnique()) ? (1) : (0);
    }
    return count;
}

Question is: Do I have to do this every time? Isn't it clunky? Is there a standard practice that I should instead be adopting?

share|improve this question
    
Do I have to do this every time? Only if you need it. Is there a standard practice that I should instead be adopting? AFAIK, no. –  Luiggi Mendoza Jun 16 '13 at 18:38
    
What you really want is a lambda parameter, but Java doesn't support that. –  SLaks Jun 16 '13 at 18:47
    
@SLaks Java 8 will support Lambda Expression, but that's more on the client side, unless I'm missing something (which is usually the case). I'm not sure how lambda will help solve my problem. –  Kafeaulait Jun 16 '13 at 22:02
    
You can make methods like countUnique() take a lambda (of T) that calls something like isUnique() on each element, instead of using an interface. –  SLaks Jun 16 '13 at 22:07

1 Answer 1

This is the main principle of OOP. You're working with objects and objects have behaviors (methods).

Every method knows what objects it is working with. For example, your method compares 2 numbers. If you pass 1 number and 1 Array of Strings it won't be able to compare them.

You don't have to use interface as upperbound in your example.It can be your class and in case you have 2 classes that have similar behavior then you create an interface and change your method above to use that interface.

Also, by Java Code Conventions interface name should start from capital letter.

share|improve this answer
    
I just realized that my example is somewhat stupid. The concern, however, was with the interface. In the example, I proclaim to be able to do X to anything, provided that that anything implements my interface. I would have less of a problem if the interface were a universal standard rather than a cocktail soup that I cooked up to fit my bill. –  Kafeaulait Jun 16 '13 at 22:08
    
it is a good practice to work with interfaces if you need scalability and be able to reuse your classes later. –  Tala Jun 17 '13 at 4:37

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