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I have a class that primarily implements some logic around a multi-dimensional array, which is essentially a grid of numbers. These numbers can swap positions, etc.. However, when they swap, other objects of the same class also appear to be modified. I'm not sure why.

I'm using instance variables to store the grid, so I don't understand why changes are apparently affecting other class members.

Here's a simplified example;

class TestGrid
attr_accessor :grid
@grid = []

def initialize(newgrid)
    @grid = newgrid
end

def to_s
    out = ""
    @grid.each{|row|
      out += row.join("|") + "\n"
    }
    out
end

def swap(x, y)
    @grid[x[0]][x[1]], @grid[y[0]][y[1]] = @grid[y[0]][y[1]], @grid[x[0]][x[1]]
end

end

When we interact with a single instance in IRB, things look fine;

1.9.3-p385 :001 > require './TestGrid.rb'
 => true 
1.9.3-p385 :002 > x = TestGrid.new([[1,2],[3,4]])
 => 1|2
 3|4

1.9.3-p385 :003 > x.swap([0,1],[1,1])
 => [4, 2] 
1.9.3-p385 :004 > puts  x
1|4
3|2
 => nil 

However, if I create a second instance by cloning or duping;

1.9.3-p385 :006 >   x = TestGrid.new([[1,2],[3,4]])
 => 1|2
3|4

1.9.3-p385 :007 > y = x.clone
 => 1|2
3|4

1.9.3-p385 :008 > x.swap([0,1],[1,1])
 => [4, 2] 
1.9.3-p385 :009 > puts x 
1|4
3|2
 => nil 
1.9.3-p385 :010 > puts y
1|4
3|2
 => nil 

Why are my changes to x also being applied to y? From my understanding of Object#Clone, theses are supposed to be distinct instance, unrelated to each other. Their object ID's would seem to support that expectation;

1.9.3-p385 :012 > puts "#{x.object_id} #{y.object_id}"
70124426240320 70124426232820

For reference, I ended up creating an initialize_copy method which ensures the affected parameter is deep copied. I didn't really like the idea of Marshalling objects around just to copy an array deeply, so I decided on this instead.

def initialize_copy(original)
  super
  @grid = []
  original.grid.each{|inner|
    @grid << inner.dup
  }
 end
share|improve this question
    
That @grid in the class declaration isn't doing what you think it is. –  Dave Newton Jun 16 '13 at 21:17

1 Answer 1

up vote 2 down vote accepted

By default, dup and clone produce shallow copies of the objects they are invoked on. Meaning that x and y in your example still reference the same area of memory.

http://ruby-doc.org/core-2.0/Object.html#method-i-dup

http://ruby-doc.org/core-2.0/Object.html#method-i-clone

You can override them inside of your customized class to produce a deep copy in a different area of memory.

A common idiom in Ruby is to use the Marshal#load and Marshal#dump methods of the Object superclass to produce deep copies. (Note: these methods are normally used to serialize/deserialze objects).

 def dup
   new_grid = Marshal.load( Marshal.dump(@grid) )

   new_grid
 end

irb(main):007:0> x = TestGrid.new([[1,2],[3,4]])
=> 1|2
3|4

irb(main):008:0> y = x.dup
=> [[1, 2], [3, 4]]
irb(main):009:0> x.swap([0,1],[1,1])
=> [4, 2]
irb(main):010:0> puts x
1|4
3|2
=> nil
irb(main):011:0> y
=> [[1, 2], [3, 4]]
irb(main):012:0> puts y
1
2
3
4
=> nil
irb(main):013:0>

y remains the same after the swap.

Alternatively, create a new array, iterate through @grid and push its subarrays into the array.

 def dup
   new_grid = []

   @grid.each do |g|
      new_grid << g
   end

   new_grid
 end
share|improve this answer
    
Thanks! This is a big help. I'm a little hesistant to just start serializing/deserializing for now reason other than a copy, but this got me started down the right path. I ended up creating an initialize_copy method for my class that handles deeply copying the array in question. –  user2491462 Jun 17 '13 at 13:23
    
There is a simpler alternative that I can post above if you like, I just wanted to answer in one line :) –  Hunter McMillen Jun 17 '13 at 13:46
    
If you want to share, I wouldn't mind. It might be nice to have other possibilities for posterity as well. –  user2491462 Jun 17 '13 at 22:39
    
@user2491462 I added it above. –  Hunter McMillen Jun 18 '13 at 3:27

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