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This question already has an answer here:

Can Class1 warn Class2 that it has changed without me having to create a method to access the Class1 object in Class2? Basically I want to stick to the dot notation.. No setters and getters.

class Class1 {
public:
    void operator=(Class1 class1Obj) {
        // call class1ObjWasChanged() which is in Class2 from here
    }
};

class Class2 {
public:
    Class1 class1Obj;

    void class1ObjWasChanged() {
        std::cout << "class1Obj was changed!!";
    }
};


int main() {
    Class2 class2Obj;
    Class1 someClass1Obj;

    class2Obj.class1Obj = someClass1Obj;

}

the above code should somehow, if possible, call class1ObjWasChanged(). Is that possible being that Class1 doesn't know Class2 exists?

share|improve this question

marked as duplicate by Marcin, K-ballo, billz, nvoigt, Graviton Jun 19 '13 at 9:35

This question has been asked before and already has an answer. If those answers do not fully address your question, please ask a new question.

10  
Observer pattern – yngum Jun 16 '13 at 21:47
    
no, but it can warn another object, see just referred Observer – Balog Pal Jun 16 '13 at 21:49
up vote 2 down vote accepted

As suggested in the comments you can apply the Observer pattern to accomplish this. One easy way to do this is to provide an Observer class that defines one or more pure virtual functions that will be called when a change is made. Then you will need to maintain a list of objects that want to be notified of changes. After you have put that together you can add the necessary logic in your copy assignment operator to call all objects that have requested change notifications.

#include <vector>
#include <iostream>
#include <string>

class Observable
{
public:
    // Provide class that defines the requirements of an observer class
    // that is capable of receiving change notifications.
    struct Observer
    {
        virtual ~Observer() {}

        // Pure virtual function requires all derived classes to
        // provide an implementation of the function.
        virtual void onChanged(const Observable& object) = 0;
    };

    // constructor
    Observable(const std::string& name) : name_(name) {}

    // Let the outside world add observers that will be notified.
    void addObserver(Observer* ob)
    {
        observers_.push_back(ob);
    }

    // copy assignment operator
    Observable& operator=(const Observable& other) 
    {
        name_ = other.name_;

        // alert the observers that want to know about changes
        for(auto it = observers_.begin(); it != observers_.end(); ++it)
        {
            (*it)->onChanged(*this);
        }

        return *this;
    }

    std::string name() const
    {
        return name_;
    }

private:

    std::string name_;
    std::vector<Observer*>  observers_;
};


class PeepingTom : public Observable::Observer
{
public:

    void onChanged(const Observable& object)
    {
        std::cout
            << "object name was changed to '"
            << object.name()
            << "'"
            << std::endl;
    }
};


int main()
{
    PeepingTom  observer;
    Observable  changable("some name");

    // Add the observer
    changable.addObserver(&observer);

    std::cout
        << "`changable` is currently name named '"
        << changable.name()
        << "'"
        << std::endl;
    // Change it
    changable = Observable("new name");
}
share|improve this answer
    
wow!! that was really helpful! I realize that there are some concepts I should look into to fully understand your code, but thanks! – user2142733 Jun 16 '13 at 22:30
    
@user2142733 Then accept the answer. – Mr Universe Jun 16 '13 at 22:50
    
If it's directly related to observers sum it up in a comment and I'll update my answer. Any C++ specific stuff you should be able to find on Stackoverflow though. – Captain Obvlious Jun 16 '13 at 22:51

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