Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free.

I have a 14x14 array, with each element being binary-packed information that when unpacked will give me two parameters, A and B. (Let's put the parameters in the form A:B for easier discussion here.) Now, I need to sort the array such that A increases from top to bottom (column) and B increases from left to right (row).

I thought about sorting the rows by B, and then sorting the columns by A, but then I realized that won't work. Say I sort the rows by B. Then when I sort the columns by A, that could screw up the ordering of B.

Any ideas?

share|improve this question
1  
One of them is going to have to have priority. What's the correct layout for, e.g. [[0:1 1:2 2:3 1:4] [5:6 6:7 3:8 7:1]]? –  Josh Caswell Jun 16 '13 at 21:58
    
@JoshCaswell not necessarily –  SheetJS Jun 16 '13 at 21:58
    
put it all in a 1 dimensional array and sort it –  aaronman Jun 16 '13 at 21:58
    
@aaronman - Being one dimensional vs two dimensional shouldn't affect the ability of the data to be sorted. –  Aiias Jun 16 '13 at 21:59
    
@JoshCaswell The correct arrangement is: [[0:1, 1:2, 2:3, 1:4] [7:1 5:6 6:7 3:8]]. Forgot to mention, this is in C (ugh), so I don't have any fancy pre-written functions to use for this. –  bauer2010 Jun 16 '13 at 22:02

1 Answer 1

up vote 5 down vote accepted

You can sort the entire list of 196 elements by A, then lay out the elements so that the first row contains the smallest 14 A, the next row contains the next smallest, etc. In this way, every element from the ith row is smaller (according to A) than every element from the jth row if i > j.

Then, go row by row and sort by B.

As a small example, lets do a 3x3 case with pairs (9,1) (8,2) ... (1,9). The sort by A would yield (1,9) ... (9,1) which you lay out like this:

(1,9)  (2,8)  (3,7)
(4,6)  (5,5)  (6,4)
(7,3)  (8,2)  (9,1)

Then you sort each row by B. Changing the order of the elements of B doesn't break the core assumption about A because every element in a given row are less than every element in higher rows (for example, the minimum A in the third row is 7 and the maximum A in the second row is 6).

Then you get:

(3,7)  (2,8)  (1,9)
(6,4)  (5,5)  (4,6)
(9,1)  (8,2)  (7,3)

EDIT: the question was clarified as follows:

Ok, this is starting to make sense, but say I have this: [[-1 -1 2:8 -1 -1] [ -1 3:7 4:16 5:2 -1] [ 2:14 3:9 2:6 5:9 1:2] [ -1 9:8 4:2 9:1 -1] [-1 -1 2:2 -1 -1]]. "-1" represents a null value, thus should not be sorted. The final sorted array needs to remain in such a diamond shape.

To keep the "diamond shape", you merely fill out the matrix according to the pattern. With the example:

[[-1 -1 2:8 -1 -1] [ -1 3:7 4:16 5:2 -1] [ 2:14 3:9 2:6 5:9 1:2] [ -1 9:8 4:2 9:1 -1] [-1 -1 2:2 -1 -1]]

First pull out the elements

[2:8 3:7 4:16 5:2 2:14 3:9 2:6 5:9 1:2 9:8 4:2 9:1 2:2]

Then sort by A (In this case, to break ties, we use the B value):

[1:2 2:2 2:6 2:8 2:14 3:7 3:9 4:2 4:16 5:2 5:9 9:1 9:8]

Then construct the rows we need. If you look at the pattern, the number of elements in the rows are 1,3,5,3,1, so the rows are

[[1:2] [2:2 2:6 2:8] [2:14 3:7 3:9 4:2 4:16] [5:2 5:9 9:1] [9:8]]

Now we sort the rows by B value:

[[1:2] [2:2 2:6 2:8] [4:2 3:7 3:9 2:14 4:16] [9:1 5:2 5:9] [9:8]]

Now we can rebuild the diamond:

[[-1   -1   1:2  -1     -1] 
 [-1   2:2  2:6  2:8    -1] 
 [4:2  3:7  3:9  2:14 4:16] 
 [-1   9:1  5:2  5:9    -1] 
 [-1   -1   9:8  -1     -1]]

Verify that the rows and columns are correctly sorted :)

share|improve this answer
1  
so sorting by a yields the list [(3, 2) (4, 3) (5, 1) (6, 0)], which you lay out as [[(3, 2) (4, 3)][(5, 1) (6, 0)]]. Sorting each row by B yields [[(3, 2) (4, 3)][(6, 0)(5, 1)]]. " A increases from top to bottom (column) and B increases from left to right (row)." If you read the two columns' A values you get [3,6] and [4,5] (both satisfactory) and reading B values from rows gives you [2,3] and [0,1] (both satisfactory) –  SheetJS Jun 16 '13 at 22:17
2  
Yeah, I think Nirk is right. When you sort by A, every element in every row is greater than or equal to every element in the preceding row, so the column ordering won't break however you go on to sort the rows. –  Paul Griffiths Jun 16 '13 at 22:24
1  
@bauer2010 next time ask the entire question first :) I'll edit my response to answer your new question "The final sorted array needs to remain in such a diamond shape" –  SheetJS Jun 16 '13 at 22:26
1  
@SigTerm, you'd actually get: [1:1 2:0][100:0 101:1]->row sort->[1:1 2:0][100:0 101:1]->column sort->[2:0 1:1][100:0 101:1] –  Paul Griffiths Jun 16 '13 at 22:38
1  
@SigTerm: I think your "ideal order" is addressing a question other than the one the OP asked, hence the confusion. There's no requirement in the original question for the ys in your second group to be higher than the ys in your first group. Either way, the result of your algorithm is not same same result as Nirk's algorithm would produce from the same data. –  Paul Griffiths Jun 16 '13 at 22:43

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.