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I am subscribing to NSUbiquitousKeyValueStoreDidChangeExternallyNotification to monitor key value changes from iCloud. When received, I process the userinfo included and apply my business logic.

However, sometimes (especially on first launch) I am receiving keys that seem system-related, or at least are not part of my application -

AppleKeyboards
NSInterfaceStyle
AppleKeyboardsExpanded
AppleICUForce24HourTimeAirPlayShouldShowDebugButtonInPicker

etc

  1. How can I identify such keys and avoid trying to run them against my application code? Should i somehow be 'flagging' my own data so that they can be identified?
  2. Am I responsible for updating the local values for these keys? iCloud must be sending them for a reason, but I don't know where to put them. Are they in my NSUserDefaults? Or is iCloud handling them separately (in which case it seems strange they are included in the user info)?

This is how I subscribe to notifications:

[[NSNotificationCenter defaultCenter] addObserver:self                                                   selector:@selector(iCloudStoreChanged:)
                                             name:NSUbiquitousKeyValueStoreDidChangeExternallyNotification
                                           object:store];
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1  
1) what is exactly the -[NSNotification addObserver:] call you are using? 2) are you using some weird framework ? 3) are you sure you are not also listening to NSUserDefaultsDidChangeNotification? –  Julien Jun 16 '13 at 23:57
    
I added my addObserver: - I am not using any frameworks and not listening to NSUserDefaultsDidChangeNotification anywhere in my code. –  Ben Packard Jun 17 '13 at 1:28
    
Don't you know what keys your app uses? Why not just look for known keys? –  Tom Harrington Jun 17 '13 at 17:59
    
Doesn't seem very reliable to maintain a list of keys my app uses and have to add to this list when I make changes. –  Ben Packard Jun 17 '13 at 20:32
    
If keys you are not expecting are here, someone put them in there. Maybe you are using some external framework that tried to save these keys. Try to debug your app on the device and break on -[NSUbiquitousKeyValueStore setObject:forKey:] and/or +[NSUbiquitousKeyValueStore defaultStore] –  Julien Jun 22 '13 at 5:42

1 Answer 1

up vote 0 down vote accepted

Julien had it right here. I was not using any frameworks bit forgot that previously I had used MKiCloudSync to sync my NSUserDefaults. I can only assume these keys are added to NSUserDefaults by the system and were propogated to iCloud.

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