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Well, the title says all, I tried playing a wav file using javax.sound and nothing is happening. I have tried many different files without any luck.

public static void main(String[] args) throws IOException, UnsupportedAudioFileException, LineUnavailableException
{

    File in = new File("C:\\Users\\Sandra\\Desktop\\music\\rags.wav");
    AudioInputStream audioInputStream = AudioSystem.getAudioInputStream(in);
    Clip play = AudioSystem.getClip();
    play.open(audioInputStream);
    FloatControl volume= (FloatControl) play.getControl(FloatControl.Type.MASTER_GAIN);
    volume.setValue(1.0f); // Reduce volume by 10 decibels.
    play.start();

}
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1  
Are you getting any errors or is just nothing happening? –  sirFunkenstine Jun 16 '13 at 23:35
2  
for working examples take a look stackoverflow.com/tags/javasound/info –  Pshemo Jun 16 '13 at 23:47

5 Answers 5

As, has already begin stated, you need to prevent the main thread from exiting, as this will cause the JVM to terminate.

Clip#start is not a blocking call, meaning that it will return (soon) after it is called.

I have no doubt that there are many ways to approach this problem and this is just a simple example of one of them.

public class PlayMusic {

    public static void main(String[] args) throws InterruptedException {
        Clip play = null;
        try {
            File in = new File("C:\\Users\\Public\\Music\\Sample Music\\Kalimba.wav");
            AudioInputStream audioInputStream = AudioSystem.getAudioInputStream(in);
            play = AudioSystem.getClip();
            play.open(audioInputStream);
            FloatControl volume = (FloatControl) play.getControl(FloatControl.Type.MASTER_GAIN);
            volume.setValue(1.0f); // Reduce volume by 10 decibels.
            play.start();
            // Loop until the Clip is not longer running.
            // We loop this way to allow the line to fill, otherwise isRunning will
            // return false
            //do {
            //    Thread.sleep(15);
            //} while (play.isRunning());
            play.drain();
        } catch (UnsupportedAudioFileException | IOException | LineUnavailableException ex) {
            ex.printStackTrace();
        } finally {
            try {
                play.close();
            } catch (Exception exp) {
            }
        }
        System.out.println("...");
    }
}

The actual solution will depend on your needs.

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You have to appreciate blind downvoting without the simple cortesrty to explain why, so we all can learn what would make an answer better –  MadProgrammer May 12 '14 at 9:24
    
i'll upvote you xD for the unexplained downvote –  nachokk May 13 '14 at 15:37
1  
@MadProgrammer Clip is a DataLine and as such, start() is non-blocking. However, it's explicitly stated in the interface that the method drain() is blocking: "This method blocks until the draining is complete." from DataLine.drain(). Any solution which requires artificially stalling the program from exiting is incorrect. This is explicitly explained in the Java Playing Back Audio Tutorial. –  Jared May 29 '14 at 7:18
1  
@Jared Hmm, good to know - also, very every rule, there's an excepiton ;) –  MadProgrammer May 29 '14 at 7:24

Java's sound Clip requires an active Thread to play the audio input file otherwise the application exits before the file can be played. You could add

JOptionPane.showMessageDialog(null, "Click OK to stop music");

after calling start.

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downvoter - care to comment? –  Reimeus May 12 '14 at 9:45
    
Clip is a DataLine and as such, start() is non-blocking. However, it's explicitly stated in the interface that the method drain() is blocking: "This method blocks until the draining is complete." from DataLine.drain(). Any solution which requires artificially stalling the program from exiting is incorrect. This is explicitly explained in the Java Playing Back Audio Tutorial. –  Jared May 29 '14 at 7:20

Here playing a clip

    public static void main(String[] args) throws Exception {
           File in = new File("C:\\Users\\Sandra\\Desktop\\music\\rags.wav");
           AudioInputStream audioInputStream = AudioSystem.getAudioInputStream(in);
           Clip play = AudioSystem.getClip();
           play.open(audioInputStream);
           FloatControl volume= (FloatControl)play.getControl(FloatControl.Type.MASTER_GAIN);
           volume.setValue(1.0f); // Reduce volume by 10 decibels.
           play.start();
            SwingUtilities.invokeLater(new Runnable() {
                public void run() {
                    // A GUI element to prevent the Clip's daemon Thread
                    // from terminating at the end of the main()
                    JOptionPane.showMessageDialog(null, "Close to exit!");
                }
            });
        }
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The proper way to play the audio clip is to drain the line as explained in Playing Back Audio.

So your main should look like this:

public static void main(String[] args) throws IOException,
    UnsupportedAudioFileException, LineUnavailableException
{
    File in = new File("C:\\Users\\Sandra\\Desktop\\music\\rags.wav");
    AudioInputStream audioInputStream = AudioSystem.getAudioInputStream(in);
    Clip play = AudioSystem.getClip();
    play.open(audioInputStream);
    FloatControl volume= (FloatControl) play.getControl(FloatControl.Type.MASTER_GAIN);
    volume.setValue(1.0f); // Reduce volume by 10 decibels.
    play.start();
    play.drain();
    play.close();
}

play.drain() blocks until all the data is played.

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Your program is terminating before the sound has the time to be played. I would do play.start(); in some threading way (invokeLater, ...), and also find a way to wait until the sound has finished (Reimeus suggested one).

A lead :

public static void main(String[] args) {
    javax.swing.SwingUtilities.invokeLater(new Runnable() {
        public void run() {

          ...

          play.start();
          JOptionPane.showMessageDialog(null, "Click OK to stop music");
        }
    });

}
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