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I'm trying to plot a fourier sequence of a square wave, but with many terms the program just takes too much time computate all the points. I tried to use multiprocessing module but didnt work.Please help me how to use multiprocessing. I'm running at fedora linux and have a AMD FX Octa core. Thanks

#!/usr/bin/env python

import pylab,math

#Square Wave approximation by Fourier Series:
#y=4/pi*(sin(x) + sin(3x)/3 + sin(5x)/5 + ... n) terms

n=input("how many terms do you want?")
y=[]
# generate x's to calculate the points. 
x=pylab.arange(0,360,0.5)
#generate de odd numbers to add the sines terms
impar=range(1,n+2,2)
no=4/math.pi #just for normalize the sequence to converge to 1 (not pi/4)
#calculate the points
for ps in x:
    a=0
    for i in impar:
        a=a+(((math.sin(math.radians(i*ps)))/i))
    a=no*a
    y.append(a)

#plot
pylab.figure()
pylab.plot(x,y,"o")
pylab.title(str(n)+str(" terms"))
pylab.grid()
#save a image(just in case)
pylab.savefig(str(n)+str("sqwv.png"))
#show the graph
pylab.show()
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2 Answers 2

up vote 1 down vote accepted

The problem is embarrassingly parallel so it is easy to make the script to use multiple CPUs. Building on @HYRY's answer:

from multiprocessing.dummy import Pool # use threads

def compute_y(i):
    np.add.reduce(no * np.sin(np.radians(impar * x[i])) / impar, out=y[i])

step = 10**8 // n 
Pool().map(compute_y, (slice(j, j + step) for j in range(0, len(x), step)))

Vectorized numpy operations release GIL so this code should be able to utilize multiple CPUs.

The full script:

#!/usr/bin/env python
"""Square Wave approximation by Fourier Series."""
import math
from multiprocessing.dummy import Pool # use threads
from timeit import default_timer as timer

import matplotlib.pyplot as plt
import numpy as np

n = 100000 # compute first n terms in the series

# generate x's to calculate the points.
x = np.arange(0, 360, .1)

# generate odd numbers to add the sines terms
impar = np.c_[1:n+2:2]
no = 4 / math.pi # just for normalize the sequence to converge to 1 (not pi/4)

# calculate the points
start = timer()
# y = 4/pi*(sin(x) + sin(3x)/3 + sin(5x)/5 + ... n) terms
y = np.empty_like(x)

def compute_y(i):
    t = impar * x[i]
    np.radians(t, out=t)
    np.sin(t, out=t)
    t *= no
    t /= impar
    np.add.reduce(t, out=y[i])

step = 10**8 // n
Pool().map(compute_y, (slice(j, j + step) for j in range(0, len(x), step)))
print("y calc. takes us %.2f seconds" % (timer() - start,))

# plot
plt.plot(x, y, "-")
plt.title("%d terms" % n)
plt.grid()
# save a image(just in case)
plt.savefig("%dsqwv.png" % n)
# show the graph
plt.show()
share|improve this answer

You can use numpy's ufunc to speedup the calculation:

y = reduce(np.add, (np.sin(np.radians(i*x))/i for i in impar))

Here is the full code:

import pylab,math
import numpy as np
#Square Wave approximation by Fourier Series:
#y=4/pi*(sin(x) + sin(3x)/3 + sin(5x)/5 + ... n) terms

n = 1000

# generate x's to calculate the points. 
x=pylab.arange(0,360,0.5)
#generate de odd numbers to add the sines terms
impar=range(1,n+2,2)
no=4/math.pi #just for normalize the sequence to converge to 1 (not pi/4)
#calculate the points

y = reduce(np.add, (np.sin(np.radians(i*x))/i for i in impar)) * no

#plot
pylab.figure()
pylab.plot(x,y,"-")
pylab.title(str(n)+str(" terms"))
pylab.grid()
#save a image(just in case)
pylab.savefig(str(n)+str("sqwv.png"))
#show the graph
pylab.show()

One my PC, it takes about 200ms when n is 10000.

share|improve this answer
1  
Thanks HYRY, but the numpy ufunc uses all cores of the CPU? I wish I could do with n=1mi and the step on the x's ==0.005. –  Caioau Jun 17 '13 at 1:59

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