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struct findaddress {
     struct findaddress *next[11];
     struct user *myuser;
};
int main(void){
struct findaddress *findhead=(struct findaddress *)(malloc(sizeof(struct findaddress)));
    int i=0;
    for (i;i!=11;i++){
        if (findhead->next[i]==NULL)puts("success");else puts("fail");
    }
    return 0;
}

The Result, disturbingly enough for me, is:

fail
fail
success
success
success
success
success
success
success
success
success

I have no idea why the two pointers on the bottom are failing, while the other pointers are passing.

Could someone be so kind as to enlighten me?

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1  
Did you expect calloc in place of malloc? Is it a typo ? –  VoidPointer Jun 17 '13 at 3:50
1  
what's the definition of struct findaddress? –  Nirk Jun 17 '13 at 3:52
1  
Since you've not set the data returned by malloc() to any known value, you get whatever garbage you get, and your code is at fault for trying to read the data before it is initialized. It also seems odd to allocate one structure and then expect 11 of them to be available for checking...you've got some gaps in your code or your understanding. –  Jonathan Leffler Jun 17 '13 at 3:53
    
Sorry, I forgot the definition, thought I had it on there. –  user1833028 Jun 17 '13 at 4:06
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2 Answers 2

malloc() does not initialize the memory, only allocating the space on the heap. The content of the array you see is random. It is just the previous content of the same area.

Use calloc() if you want to make sure it is initialized with zeros.

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Why did you expect anything to be initialized to anything in this case? malloc does not initialize the allocated memory at all, which is basically what you are observing in your experiment.

If you want to zero-initialize your struct object, do

*findhead = (struct findaddress) { 0 };

after malloc. Or, if you want your memory to be filled with physical all-bits-zero pattern, use calloc instead of malloc.

P.S. What is the purpose of that i in the first part of for (i;i!=11;i++)? If your i is already pre-initialized, you can just do for (;i!=11;i++).

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Does { 0 } have a meaning unique to structs, or a more general definition in the C language? –  user1833028 Jun 17 '13 at 4:27
    
The { 0 } initializer can be used with structures or arrays, and means 'initialize the first member (element) to zero, and implicitly initialize all the others to zero too'. You can initialize the first element to any value you like (zero happened to be used in the example). You can also initialize explicitly more members or elements than just the first by listing them. See also 'designated initializers' in C99 and above. –  Jonathan Leffler Jun 17 '13 at 4:37
    
@user1833028: In C the { 0 } initializer can be used to initialize anything. Specifically in order to extend its applicability the language allows it even with scalars, e.g. int x = { 0 } is valid initialization. When it comes to assignment, you can use { 0 } through compound literals (as shown in my answer) with anything except arrays (since arrays are not assignable). –  AndreyT Jun 17 '13 at 4:48
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