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Here is my code:

// WorkDamnit.cpp : Defines the entry point for the console application.
//

#include "stdafx.h"


class Scheduler
{

public:

    typedef void (*function_ptr) (void); 

    struct Task
    {
        function_ptr    function; 
        int             numOfTasks;
    };

    void Init(Task *tasks, int numOfTasks); 



private: 
    int     _numOfTasks; 
    Task    *_tasks; 

};

void Scheduler::Init(Scheduler::Task *tasks, int numOfTasks)
{
    _tasks = tasks; 
    _numOfTasks = numOfTasks;
}


void count() {}; 



Scheduler::Task task_list = 
{
    count, 1
}; 


Scheduler scheduler; 

Scheduler.Init(Scheduler::Task &task_list,1); 

int _tmain(int argc, _TCHAR* argv[])
{
    return 0;
}

I get the following errors from the compiler:

1>c:\users\evan\documents\visual studio 2012\projects\workdamnit\workdamnit\workdamnit.cpp(49): error C2143: syntax error : missing ';' before '.'
1>c:\users\evan\documents\visual studio 2012\projects\workdamnit\workdamnit\workdamnit.cpp(49): error C2059: syntax error : '.'

The compiler doesnt seem to like the line after the class object definition. When i try to call the init() member. All i can think of is that it has to do with the pointer to function reference. Maybe someone can shed some light on this for me?

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3  
Scheduler.Init(Scheduler::Task &task_list,1); is not legal. Not at namespace scope, not at class scope... –  Luchian Grigore Jun 17 '13 at 4:40
1  
projects\ workdamnit\workdamnit\workdamnit.cpp, I liked it. –  Marlon Jun 17 '13 at 4:41
    
Where are you trying to make this call to "Init" from and what object instance are you trying to invoke it from? –  kfsone Jun 17 '13 at 4:47
    
When you clear this problem up (for educational purposes), use std::function<void(void)> :) –  Spook Jun 17 '13 at 4:49
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2 Answers

up vote 1 down vote accepted

You can call call functions/methods directly outside of other methods/functions.

Scheduler.Init(Scheduler::Task &task_list,1);

2 problems in this line. The above seems to be outside of any function/method. For eg. you can put in inside main.

The line itself is not correct. So change it to

scheduler.Init(&task_list,1);

Usually you call a method on an object not a class name, except for static methods. You don't pass the parameter type while passing parameters to the method.

So the changed line in main will look like

int _tmain(int argc, _TCHAR* argv[])

{
    scheduler.Init(&task_list,1); 

    return 0;
}
share|improve this answer
    
sorry guys. I had tried it as scheduler.Init(&task_list,1), i just didnt put it in main.... i didnt know that would make a difference. outside of main it says that the function has no storage class or type specifier. Can anyone tell me why being within main() in this case does not throw the same error? –  EvanJ227 Jun 17 '13 at 6:05
    
@EvanJ227 - I tried it outside of main,and I get a different error. error C2143: syntax error : missing ';' before '.' error C4430: missing type specifier - int assumed. Note: C++ does not support default-int error C2371: 'scheduler' : redefinition; different basic types –  user93353 Jun 17 '13 at 7:31
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Line 49 should be:

scheduler.Init(Scheduler::Task &task_list,1); // note the lowercase 's': the object should be used, not the class

Also it should be within a function (maybe main in your case)

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How is that going to be legal outside of a function body? –  kfsone Jun 17 '13 at 4:46
    
Ah I didn't see that; sorry will edit the post –  user1952500 Jun 17 '13 at 4:47
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