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How can I select nodes that begin with "x-" tag name, here is a hierarchy DOM tree example:

<div>
  <x-tab>
    <div></div>
    <div>
      <x-map></x-map>
    </div>
  </x-tab>
</div>
<x-footer></x-footer>

jQuery does not allow me to query $('x-*'), is there any way that can help me achieve this?

share|improve this question
2  
Is this valid at first place? <x-map></x-map> –  Mr. Alien Jun 17 '13 at 5:14
1  
actually is a new way to declare custom elements, just like x-tags.org or polymer-project.org project –  mateusmaso Jun 17 '13 at 5:15
1  
@Scott Selby: :contains() is for text, not tag names. –  BoltClock Jun 17 '13 at 5:24
1  
I'd lean towards no simple out-of-the-box solution, since the jQuery element selector ends up calling getElementsByTagName(), which doesn't do wildcards. –  ajp15243 Jun 17 '13 at 5:25
1  
This is not valid HTML and check the x-tags.org itself is not valid. validator.w3.org/… –  Chamika Sandamal Jun 17 '13 at 5:43

8 Answers 8

up vote 4 down vote accepted

There is no native way to do this, it has worst performance, so, just do it yourself.

Example:

var results = $("div").find("*").filter(function(){
    return /^x\-/i.test(this.nodeName);
});

Full example:

http://jsfiddle.net/6b8YY/3/

Notes: (Updated, see comments)

If you are wondering why I use this way for checking tag name, see:
JavaScript: case-insensitive search
and see comments as well.

Also, if you are wondering about the find method instead of adding to selector, since selectors are matched from right not from left, it may be better to separate the selector. I could also do this:
$("*", $("div")). Preferably though instead of just div add an ID or something to it so that parent match is quick.

In the comments you'll find a proof that it's not faster. This applies to very simple documents though I believe, where the cost of creating a jQuery object is higher than the cost of searching all DOM elements. In realistic page sizes though this will not be the case.

Update:

I also really like Teifi's answer. You can do it in one place and then reuse it everywhere. For example, let me mix my way with his:

// In some shared libraries location:
$.extend($.expr[':'], {
    x : function(e) {
            return /^x\-/i.test(this.nodeName);
    }
});

// Then you can use it like:
$(function(){
    // One way
    var results = $("div").find(":x");

    // But even nicer, you can mix with other selectors
    //    Say you want to get <a> tags directly inside x-* tags inside <section>
    var anchors = $("section :x > a");

    // Another example to show the power, say using a class name with it:
    var highlightedResults = $(":x.highlight");
    // Note I made the CSS class right most to be matched first for speed
});

It's the same performance hit, but more convenient API.

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1  
+1 I was also trying to do the same. –  Praveen Jun 17 '13 at 6:16
    
Great. I also found a nicer way to wrap it. See update. –  Meligy Jun 17 '13 at 10:59
1  
As per pretty much all jQuery performance articles (proven by many JSPerf tests), native browser selectors are the fastest. For something like pseudo element (the updated version) and pretty much any selector not supported by browser natively (non CSS), JS (jQuery) has to get all elements in scope (that's why limiting the scope parent) and test each and every element instead of asking the browser to return them directly. –  Meligy Jun 17 '13 at 11:24
1  
Some good references and tests on the topic: seesparkbox.com/foundry/jquery_selector_performance_testing , also encosia.com/… , and eng.wealthfront.com/2010/10/jquery-right-way.html –  Meligy Jun 17 '13 at 11:24
1  
There is also some good information on how it works here wordsbyf.at/2011/11/23/selectors-selectoring and of course the official jQuery performance learning page learn.jquery.com/performance/optimize-selectors –  Meligy Jun 17 '13 at 11:29

The below is just working fine. Though I am not sure about performance as I am using regex.

$('body *').filter(function(){
    return /^x-/i.test(this.nodeName);
}).each(function(){
    console.log(this.nodeName);
});

Working fiddle

PS: In above sample, I am considering body tag as parent element.

UPDATE :

After checking Mohamed Meligy's post, It seems regex is faster than string manipulation in this condition. and It could become more faster (or same) if we use find. Something like this:

$('body').find('*').filter(function(){
    return /^x-/i.test(this.nodeName);
}).each(function(){
    console.log(this.nodeName);
});

jsperf test

UPDATE 2:

If you want to search in document then you can do the below which is fastest:

$(Array.prototype.slice.call(document.all)).filter(function () {
    return /^x-/i.test(this.nodeName);
}).each(function(){
    console.log(this.nodeName);
});

jsperf test

share|improve this answer
    
I like it, there may be a better way to improve this but for now may help me out.. –  mateusmaso Jun 17 '13 at 5:53
    
Good update. I have added comments to my answer about this. Thanks for bringing it up. I have upvoted your answer. –  Meligy Jun 18 '13 at 3:22
    
Be careful with these tests though, as they are not good examples. The ratio of other elements to the ones you want is unlikely to be the same in a real full page. Interesting seeing document.all though. I thought it was an old thing. –  Meligy Jun 18 '13 at 23:52
    
@MohamedMeligy Thanks, I will be careful with the tests though. :) –  Mr_Green Jun 19 '13 at 2:57

It might not be efficient, but consider it as a last option if you do not get any answer.
Try adding a custom attribute to these tags. What i mean is when you add a tag for eg. <x-tag>, add a custom attribute with it and assign it the same value as the tag, so the html looks like <x-tag CustAttr="x-tag">.
Now to get tags starting with x-, you can use the following jQuery code:

$("[CustAttr^=x-]")

and you will get all the tags that start with x-

share|improve this answer
    
I thought about this solution also.. but the problem is that you need to add an attribute everytime, the idea behind the tag name beginning with "x-" was to help querying instead of allowing all type of custom elements without any pattern –  mateusmaso Jun 17 '13 at 5:29
    
@mateusmaso: Off topic, but I wonder such an idea was even proposed. We've had a markup language that looks like HTML but provides namespacing out of the box for over a decade now; it's called XML, and it manifests in HTML as XHTML. Then again, jQuery doesn't support XML namespaces anyway, making that point quite moot. –  BoltClock Jun 17 '13 at 5:31

Although this does not answer the question directly it could provide a solution, by "defining" the tags in the selector you can get all of that type?

$('x-tab, x-map, x-footer')
share|improve this answer
    
Yeah, short of specifying each individual element name there really isn't any other way. –  BoltClock Jun 17 '13 at 5:45

custom jquery selector

jQuery(function($) {
    $.extend($.expr[':'], {
        X : function(e) {
            return /^x-/i.test(e.tagName);
        }
    });
});

than, use $(":X") or $("*:X") to select your nodes.

share|improve this answer
    
Good call for expressions :) –  Meligy Jun 17 '13 at 11:00
    
@MohamedMeligy Thanks –  Teifi Jun 18 '13 at 0:30

See if this works!

function getXNodes() {
  var regex = /x-/, i = 0, totalnodes = [];
  while (i !== document.all.length) {
    if (regex.test(document.all[i].nodeName)) {
      totalnodes.push(document.all[i]);
    }
    i++;
  }
  return totalnodes;
}
share|improve this answer

Demo Fiddle

var i=0;
for(i=0; i< document.all.length; i++){
    if(document.all[i].nodeName.toLowerCase().indexOf('x-') !== -1){
        $(document.all[i].nodeName.toLowerCase()).addClass('test');
    }
}
share|improve this answer

Try this

var test = $('[x-]');
if(test)
    alert('eureka!');

Basically jQuery selector works like CSS selector. Read jQuery selector API here.

share|improve this answer
3  
If you had read it yourself you would have realized that this won't actually work. –  BoltClock Jun 17 '13 at 5:21

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