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I want to prevent all exceptions thrown by referenced libraries from escaping my library. I am doing this by filtering all functions through try catch which wraps exceptions if they are not MyException type. The problem that I have is that in my wrap function if the exception is MyException type I end up loosing my original stack trace since I end up re-throwing the same exception from a new place and don't embed the exception that was originally thrown, since the stack trace gets recorded from a new place where exception is re-thrown the stack trace of original throw is lost.

public static Exception Wrap(Exception exception)
{
    Exception exceptionToReturn;
    if (exception is MyException)
    {
        exceptionToReturn = exception;
    }
    else
    {
        exceptionToReturn = new MyException("Referenced library exception wrapped", exception);
    }

    return exception;
}

What I am trying to do is to re-throw the same type of exceptions that derived from MyException to keep the original stack trace. However I do not want to check for every child of MyException with code like:

(exception is ChildOfMyException)
    exceptionToReturn = new ChildOfMyException(exception.Message, exception);

If I use generics. I cannot specify an explicit constructor.

public static Exception Wrap<TException>(TException exception)
    where TException : Exception, new()
{
    Exception exc;
    if (exception is MyException)
    {
        exc = new TException();
    }
    else
    {
        exc = new MyException("Referenced library exception wrapped", exception);
    }
    return exc;
}

Is there some way that I am missing or will I have to use reflection to modify _innerException field.

share|improve this question
    
why not just rethrow? –  Robert Rouhani Jun 17 '13 at 6:06
    
Don't wrap all your functions in try catch block. Use AOP. –  Guillaume Jun 17 '13 at 6:07
    
This is where an exception filter could have come in handy (leaving aside the discussion of whether it's actually safe for you to catch every type of exception - it's usually an unsafe assumption). However, they're not available in C#. They exist in IL, so you could access them via some form of post-build re-write. Basically, if they existed in C#, you would have something like catch(Exception ex) where (!ex is MyException) {} –  Damien_The_Unbeliever Jun 17 '13 at 6:11

2 Answers 2

up vote 3 down vote accepted

First of all, if your want to rethrow an exception, use:

throw;

and not

throw ex;

The last statement will overwrite your stack trace, the first statement will preserve it.

You can only rethrow an exception inside the catch-block, but not inside anoother method. You could try something like this:

try
{
    // Any code
}
catch(MyException ex)
{
    throw;
}
catch(Exception ex)
{
    throw Wrap(ex);
}

Where your Wrap method only wraps the the exceptions that must be wrapped. In essence it becomes this:

try
{
    // Any code
}
catch(MyException ex)
{
    throw;
}
catch(Exception ex)
{
    throw new MyException("Referenced library exception wrapped", ex);
}

If this does not work for you (because try-catch blocks get repeated over and over), you also could take a look at AOP which might do it for you. Using postsharp, your method could become a bit like:

[ExceptionPolicy(bla bla)]
void MyMethod()
{
    // Any code
}

Read more at: http://www.postsharp.net/

share|improve this answer

If you want to save the original stacktrace and rethrow the original exception you have to throw instead of throw ex. So your wrap function needs to return a boolean which will indicate a throw or rethrow, along with the new exception if there is any.

Something like this:

public static bool Wrap(ref Exception exception) {
    if (exception is MyException) {
        // false indicates a rethrow of the original exception
        return false;
    }
    exception = new MyException("Referenced library exception wrapped", exception);
    return true;
}

// Calling code
try {
    // Something
} catch (Exception ex) {
    if (SomeClass.Wrap(ref ex))
        throw ex;
    throw;
}
share|improve this answer

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