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First of all I read this on an article - which basically tells me I should not be using a singleton at all -

Most commonly, singletons don't allow any parameters to be specified when creating the instance - as otherwise a second request for an instance but with a different parameter could be problematic! (If the same instance should be accessed for all requests with the same parameter, the factory pattern is more appropriate.)

Since I need parameters, and same instances with same parameters - I concluded I need a factory pattern.

But I was unable to find a good factory pattern implementation anywhere.

Kindly direct me if you find any good c# singleton factory pattern implementation with parameters

Ok I am going to try and be very specific here... hope this explains my situation.

Alternate methods are most welcome. I just combined a lot of implementations - my understanding may be off.

So I have a class 'A'. It is a class used to connect to a database - Database connection.

The connection needs 4 parameters & the constraints are:

  1. I need to have multiple connections possible - with different databases (parameters differ)

  2. I need only 1 instance of a specific connection - a singleton with parameters which are same (in my understanding)

  3. I will need a factory model as per the article mentioned above and also to limit the number of connections, close the connection after a timeout etc.

On this basis I need a singleton factory with paramenters/arguements... I assume

So the class A is going to look something like this

<which access modifier ?> Class A {
    private Class A(string hostname, string port, string username, string pw_hash) {
        //create a new instance with the specified parameters
    }
    //other methods on the connection
    protected void close() {
        //close the connection
    }
}

public class AFactory//should it inherit class A?? {

        private IList<A> connections = new List<A>();
        private AFactory()
        {
            //do something
        }
        private static readonly Lazy<AFactory> lazy
            = new Lazy<AFactory>(() => new AFactory());

        public static AFactory Instance { get { return lazy.Value; } }

        public A getA(string hostname, string service, string username, string pw_hash)
        {
            foreach (A a in A)
            {
                if (a.hostname == hostname && a.service == service && a.username == username)
                    return a;
            }
            A d = new A(hostname, service, username, pw_hash);
            connections.Add(d);
            return d;
        }

Now this works well and good as long as the class A constructor is public - but It kind of defeats the purpose of a singleton. What do I need to do to get this code to work.

I need only 1 instance of class A for the specified parameters.

Thanks

Indrajit

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2  
This question is not related with Java. –  Luiggi Mendoza Jun 17 '13 at 6:12
    
why do u need a factory to create a singleton object? –  Naveen Babu Jun 17 '13 at 6:19
1  
as long as the class A constructor is public You can implement A as inner class of factory to disallow client calls to connection constructor. As an alternative you can create an IConnection interface/abstract class and implement it as private nested class in factory –  default locale Jun 17 '13 at 6:21
1  
@rtindru I, probably, should have said nested class –  default locale Jun 17 '13 at 7:22
1  
@rtindru You can create public interface IConnection and make nested class to implement it. Nested class will be invisible to clients. At the same time they will be able to access it through interface. –  default locale Jun 17 '13 at 7:39
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4 Answers

Factory is used to generate object rather than manage object. I think a DB connection manager is more suitable in your situation. You can declare the manager as singleton. For individual connection you can use internal class/struct.

See below example:

class DBConnectionManager
{        
    struct Connection
    {
      public string Hostname;
      public string ServerName;
      public string UserName;
      public string Password;

      public void Connect()
      {
      }

      public void Close()
      {
      } 
    }

    private static s_instance;
    public static DBConnectionManager Instance
    {
        get {return s_instance; }
    }

    private List<Connection> m_connections;

    public Connection GetConnection(string hostname, string serverName, string userName, string password)
    {
        // if already exist in m_connections
        // return the connection
        // otherwise create new connection and add to m_connections    
    }

    public void CloseConnection(string hostname, string serverName, string userName, string password)
    {
        // if find it in m_connections
        // then call Close()
    }

    public void CloseAll()
    {
        //
    }        
} 
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So I have done this and it works... can you tell me if it is correct. And also is it Thread-Safe?

public Class A 
{
    private A(string hostname, string port, string username, string pw_hash) {
        //create a new instance with the specified parameters
    }
    //other methods on the connection
    protected void close() {
        //close the connection
    }
    public class AFactory 
    {
    private IList<A> connections = new List<A>();
    private AFactory()
    {
        //do something
    }
    private static readonly Lazy<AFactory> lazy
        = new Lazy<AFactory>(() => new AFactory());

    public static AFactory Instance { get { return lazy.Value; } }

    public A getA(string hostname, string service, string username, string pw_hash)
    {
        foreach (A a in connections)
        {
            if (a.hostname == hostname && a.service == service && a.username == username)
                return a;
        }
        A d = new A(hostname, service, username, pw_hash);
        connections.Add(d);
        return d;
    }
    }

}

I am using it like this:

A.AFactory fact = A.AFactory.Instance;
A conn = fact.getA(a, b, c, d);
A conn2 = fact.getA(e, f, g, h);

Is there something glaringly wrong with this implementation?

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you could try this:

public static class Singlett<Param,T>
   where T : class
{
    static volatile Lazy<Func<Param, T>> _instance;
    static object _lock = new object();

    static Singlett()
    {
    }

    public static Func<Param, T> Instance
    {
        get
        {
            if (_instance == null)
            {
                _instance = new Lazy<Func<Param, T>>(() =>
                {
                    lock (Singlett<Param,T>._lock)
                    {
                        try
                        {
                            ConstructorInfo constructor = null;
                            Type[] methodArgs = { typeof(Param) };                                
                            constructor = typeof(T).GetConstructor(BindingFlags.Instance | BindingFlags.NonPublic, null, methodArgs, null);// Binding flags excludes public constructors.
                            if (constructor == null)
                            {
                                constructor = typeof(T).GetConstructor(BindingFlags.Public, null, methodArgs, null);
                                if (constructor == null)
                                    return delegate(Param o) { return (T)Activator.CreateInstance(typeof(T), new object[] { o }); };
                            }
                            return delegate(Param o) { return (T)constructor.Invoke(new object[] { o }); };
                        }
                        catch (Exception exception)
                        {
                            throw exception;
                        }
                    }
                });
            }
            return _instance.Value;
        }
    }
}

then to use it: instead of

int i = 10;
MyClass class = new MyClass(i);

you can write:

int i = 10;
MyClass class = Singlett<int,MyClass>.Instance(i);
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Try this:

This interface is exposed from the factory initializer and contains the exposed methods and properties.

public interface IDatabase
{
    string ConnectionString { get; set; }
    IDataReader ExecuteSql(string sql);
}

Factory base abstract class where you can perform common features to different types of database factories.

public abstract class FactoryBase
{
    public FactoryBase() { }

    public abstract IDatabase GetDataLayer();
}

Concrete sql class that contains your calls. Have a look at the ExecuteSql method. The connection is self contained in the command so you don't have to worry about opening and closing and disposing of it.

public class SQL : IDatabase
{
    private string m_ConnectionString = string.Empty;

    public string ConnectionString
    {
        get { return m_ConnectionString; }
        set { m_ConnectionString = value; }
    }

    public IDataReader ExecuteSql(string sql)
    {
        using (var command = new SqlCommand(sql, new SqlConnection(ConnectionString)) { CommandType = CommandType.Text, CommandText = sql, CommandTimeout = 0 })
        {
            if (command.Connection.State != ConnectionState.Open) command.Connection.Open();
            return command.ExecuteReader();
        }
    }
}

Sql factory class that creates an instance of the Sql concrete class.

class SQLFactory : FactoryBase
{
    public override IDatabase GetDataLayer()
    {
        return new SQL();
    }
}

The factory initializer class that a developer will use to pass in a type of factory and it will return the IDatabase.

public static class FactoryInitializer
{
    public static IDatabase LoadFactory<T>(string connectionstring) where T : FactoryBase, new()
    {
        var factory = new T();
        var data = factory.GetDataLayer();
        data.ConnectionString = connectionstring;
        return data;
    }
}

Then use it as:

var factory = FactoryInitializer.LoadFactory<SQLFactory>(connectionString);
factory.ExecuteSql("SELECT ...");

You can then create may be an OracleFactory and an Oracle concrete class and use it the same way.

share|improve this answer
    
I'm using a database called Palo. I should have mentioned that earlier I guess. Will go through what you've said though, see if I can apply it. –  rtindru Jun 17 '13 at 7:55
    
It doesn't matter what database you have. With the factory implementation, the idea is to have a generic factory which can consume any type of database as long as there are some commonalities. e.g. In my example above, Palo should know what IDataReader is then you can use Palo database with this pattern too. –  Azhar Khorasany Jun 17 '13 at 7:58
    
Palo is not a sql database. It is a multi - dimensional cube database. I'm not so sure if this applies. But I get your point. –  rtindru Jun 17 '13 at 8:06
    
You can amend the IDatabase, Factory and concrete classes to suit your needs. The implementation/concept will still be the same. –  Azhar Khorasany Jun 17 '13 at 8:09
    
Using a factory usually has the benefit that a client does not need to know about what exactly is created by the factory (in your case SQL, Oracle, ...). This is not the case for your suggestion. How is FactoryInitializer.LoadFactory<SQLFactory>(connectionString); better than new SQLFactory(connectionString)? –  Florian Greinacher Jun 17 '13 at 8:21
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