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The problem I have is a circular dependency issue in C header files ...Having looked around I suspect the solution will have something to do with Forward Definitions, but although there are many similar problems listed, none seem to offer the information I require to resolve this one...

I have the following 5 source files:

// fwd1.h
#ifndef __FWD1_H
#define __FWD1_H

#include "fwd2.h"

typedef
  struct Fwd1 {
    Fwd2  *f;
 }
Fwd1;

void  fwd1 (Fwd1 *f1,  Fwd2 *f2) ;

#endif // __FWD1_H

.

// fwd1.c
#include "fwd1.h"
#include "fwd2.h"
void  fwd1 (Fwd1 *f1,  Fwd2 *f2)  { return; }

.

// fwd2.h
#ifndef __FWD2_H
#define __FWD2_H

#include "fwd1.h"

typedef
  struct Fwd2 {
    Fwd1  *f;
  }
Fwd2;

void  fwd2 (Fwd1 *f1,  Fwd2 *f2) ;

#endif // __FWD2_H

.

// fwd2.c
#include "fwd1.h"
#include "fwd2.h"
void  fwd2 (Fwd1 *f1,  Fwd2 *f2)  { return; }

.

// fwdMain.c
#include "fwd1.h"
#include "fwd2.h"
int  main (int argc, char** argv, char** env)
{
  Fwd1  *f1 = (Fwd1*)0;
  Fwd2  *f2 = (Fwd2*)0;

  fwd1(f1, f2);
  fwd2(f1, f2);

  return 0;
}

Which I am compiling with the command: gcc fwdMain.c fwd1.c fwd2.c -o fwd -Wall

I have tried several ideas to resolve the compile errors, but have only managed to replace the errors with other errors ...How do I resolve the circular dependency issue with the least changes to my code? ...Ideally, as a matter of coding style, I would like to avoid putting the word "struct" all over my code.

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Circular dependency is often a bad idea. Could you merge Fwd1 and Fwd2 into one structure? like 'struct Fw {Fw *f1; Fw **f2;}' ? Another thing you haven't initialised 'f1' and 'f2' in your 'main()'. –  Thanushan Balakrishnan Jun 17 '13 at 7:05
    
@BlueChip Please if an answer solves your inconvenient, then mark it as correct so others with a similar inconvenient will know it is a solution. –  cgledezma Jun 24 '13 at 6:58
    
@Thanushan Balakrishnan : As you can imagine, the actual problem is considerably more complex than this simplified example. Sadly combining the elements is not a (reasonable) option ...@cgledezma - I seem to have my email options set wrongly as I was not informed of solution having been posted –  BlueChip Jun 29 '13 at 16:18
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3 Answers

up vote 2 down vote accepted

The problem here is that when you do circular types, then on the first compiler run, gcc won't have the full type definitions (that's why you get the error of undefined structures and stuff), so on the appropriate places it is necessary to place the word 'struct' before the proper names. So your declarations should look something like this:

fwd1.h:

//fwd1.h
#ifndef __FWD1_H
#define __FWD1_H

#include "fwd2.h"

typedef struct Fwd1{
    struct Fwd2  *f;
}Fwd1;


void  fwd1 (Fwd1 *f1,  struct Fwd2 *f2) ;

#endif // __FWD1_H

fwd2.h:

// fwd2.h
#ifndef __FWD2_H
#define __FWD2_H

#include "fwd1.h"

typedef struct Fwd2{
  struct Fwd1  *f;
}Fwd2;

void  fwd2 (struct Fwd1 *f1,  Fwd2 *f2) ;

#endif // __FWD2_H

Perform the equivalent changes on the function definitions on the .c. It should work like a charm.

P.S: The purpose of a .h file is to declare all the headers, i.e: function definitions, includes, etc. that your .c will need. So no need to repeat any includes on the .c apart from the one of the respective .h.

That means your fwd1.c should only include fwd1.h, and then all the other includes should be placed on fwd1.h.

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I didn't manage to test this but I think that the following variant is likely to work.

// fwd1.h
#ifndef __FWD1_H
#define __FWD1_H

struct Fwd2; // use forward declaration of Fwd2 structure

typedef
  struct Fwd1 {
    Fwd2  *f;
 }
Fwd1;

void  fwd1 (Fwd1 *f1,  Fwd2 *f2) ;

#endif // __FWD1_H

// fwd1.c is without changes

// fwd2.h
#ifndef __FWD2_H
#define __FWD2_H

struct Fwd1; // the same trick

typedef
  struct Fwd2 {
    Fwd1  *f;
  }
Fwd2;

void  fwd2 (Fwd1 *f1,  Fwd2 *f2) ;

#endif // __FWD2_H

// fwd2.c is without changes

// fwdMain.c is without changes
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Sadly, this fix does not work. –  BlueChip Jun 29 '13 at 16:26
    
This would work in C++, but in C a struct tag is not a type (unless you typedef it to the same name). –  aschepler Jun 29 '13 at 16:27
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Just add near the top of fwd1.h:

typedef struct Fwd2 Fwd2;

Now you can use Fwd2 as an incomplete type, for example to declare Fwd2* pointers. Similarly, in fwd2.h you would want:

typedef struct Fwd1 Fwd1;

fwd1.h and fwd2.h don't even need to #include each other.

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@aschelper : I was taken by such an elegant solution, but sadly main.c fails to compile when using this method as it is required to include both headers (for the function prototypes) and the redefinition of the typedefs makes the compiler belch –  BlueChip Jul 5 '13 at 17:53
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