Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

Suppose I have a data-Frame with columns a b & c, I want to sort the data-Frame by column b in ascending, and by column c in descending, how do I do this?

share|improve this question
    
check this answer stackoverflow.com/a/14946246/1948860 –  richie Jun 17 '13 at 6:44

1 Answer 1

up vote 10 down vote accepted

You can use the ascending argument of sort:

df.sort(['a', 'b'], ascending=[True, False])

For example:

In [11]: pd.DataFrame(np.random.randint(1, 5, (10,2)), columns=['a','b'])

In [12]: df1.sort(['a', 'b'], ascending=[True, False])
Out[12]:
   a  b
2  1  4
7  1  3
1  1  2
3  1  2
4  3  2
6  4  4
0  4  3
9  4  3
5  4  1
8  4  1

As commented by @renadeen

Sort isn't in place by default! So you should assign result of the sort method to a variable or add inplace=True to method call.

that is, if you want to reuse df1 as a sorted DataFrame:

df1 = df1.sort(['a', 'b'], ascending=[True, False])

or

df1.sort(['a', 'b'], ascending=[True, False], inplace=True)
share|improve this answer
1  
pd.DataFrame(randint(1, 5, (10,2)), columns=['a','b']) doesn't seem to work....TypeError: randint() takes exactly 3 arguments (4 given) –  user1234440 Feb 21 at 3:31
1  
@user1234440 ah, this is numpy's randint function (rather than from random), I'll make this clearer, sorry! i.e it was from numpy.random import randint and not from random import randint, I've changed it to use np to be more explicit. –  Andy Hayden Feb 21 at 3:49
    
Sort isn't in place by default! So you should assign result of the sort method to a variable or add inplace=True to method call. –  renadeen Sep 22 at 16:58
1  
@renadeen very good point, I've updated by answer with that comment. –  Andy Hayden Sep 22 at 17:51

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.