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When using Clang's or GCC's Darwin backends to create executables for OSX, the flag -mmacosx-version-min=version can be used to set the earliest version of OSX the executable will run on.

Is there any way to trace back from a given executable which flag was used to compile it? I.e. is there a way to determine which minimum OSX version is targeted by a given executable?

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For the record, Apple haven’t contributed to GCC since its licence was changed to GPLv3. Whenever possible, use Clang/LLVM. –  Bavarious Jun 17 '13 at 13:35

1 Answer 1

up vote 9 down vote accepted

Use otool -l /path/to/binary and inspect the LC_VERSION_MIN_MACOSX load command; specifically, the version field.

For example, a binary compiled with the 10.8 SDK with deployment target (-mmacosx-version-min) 10.8 should have an LC_VERSION_MIN_MACOSX like this:

Load command 9
      cmd LC_VERSION_MIN_MACOSX
  cmdsize 16
  version 10.8
      sdk 10.8

whereas a binary compiled with the 10.8 SDK with deployment target 10.7 should have an LC_VERSION_MIN_MACOSX load command like this:

Load command 9
      cmd LC_VERSION_MIN_MACOSX
  cmdsize 16
  version 10.7
      sdk 10.8
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Is there any way to get this information for static libraries (".a" files)? –  Jamie Bullock Apr 13 at 17:14

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