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I have an interface that, among other things, implements a "public IEnumerator GetEnumerator()" method, so I can use the interface in a foreach statement.

I implement this interface in several classes and in one of them, I want to return an empty IEnumerator. Right now I do this the following way:

public IEnumerator GetEnumerator()
{
    ArrayList arr = new ArrayList();
    return arr.GetEnumerator();
}

However I consider this an ugly hack, and I can't help but think that there is a better way of returning an empty IEnumerator. Is there?

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6 Answers 6

up vote 41 down vote accepted

This is simple in C# 2:

public IEnumerator GetEnumerator()
{
    yield break;
}

You need the yield break statement to force the compiler to treat it as an iterator block.

This will be less efficient than a "custom" empty iterator, but it's simpler code...

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It's really pointless to try to compete with you in a C# question. :-) –  Konamiman Nov 11 '09 at 10:49
3  
@Konamiman: Not at all. Remember the LINQ question you answered and then deleted, spotting that the value of the attribute was required? I missed that! –  Jon Skeet Nov 11 '09 at 10:54

There is an extra function in the framework:

public static class Enumerable
{
    public static IEnumerable<TResult> Empty<TResult>();
}

you can write

var NullEnumerable = Enumerable.Empty<int>();
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3  
To get an IEnumerator<T> instead of an IEnumerable<T>: Enumerable.Empty<Whatever>().GetEnumerator(); –  Meta-Knight Jan 26 '11 at 20:22
    
This is awesome. Thanks –  G0tPwned Dec 3 '11 at 2:21

You could implement a dummy class that implements IEnumerator, and return an instance of it:

class DummyEnumerator : IEnumerator
{
    public object Current
    {
        get
        {
            throw new InvalidOperationException();
        }
    }

    public bool MoveNext()
    {
        return false;
    }

    public void Reset()
    {
    }
}
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And the downvote is because...? –  Konamiman Jun 5 '13 at 11:53

The way I use is to use the enumerator of an empty array:

public IEnumerator GetEnumerator() {
    return new object[0].GetEnumerator();
}

It can also be used for generic IEnumerator or IEnumerable (use an array of the appropriate type)

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You can implement IEnumerator interface and IEnumerable, and return false from MoveNext function of IEnumerable interfase

private class EmptyEnumerator : IEnumerator
{


    public EmptyEnumerator()
    {
    }

    #region IEnumerator Members

    public void Reset() { }

    public object Current
    {
        get
        {
            throw new InvalidOperationException();
        }
    }
    public bool MoveNext()
    { return false; }
}


public class EmptyEnumerable : IEnumerable
{

    public IEnumerator GetEnumerator()
    {
        return new EmptyEnumerator();
    }
}
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According to MSDN documentation, Current should throw an exception in this case (msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/…) –  Konamiman Nov 11 '09 at 10:47
    
Ok thanks @Konamiman, corrected ;) –  ArsenMkrt Nov 11 '09 at 10:49

You can make a NullEnumerator which implements the IEnumerator interface. You can just pass an instance off the NullEnumerator.

here is an example of an EmptyEnumerator

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